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The PJ Tatler

by
Bryan Preston

Bio

April 30, 2014 - 2:34 pm

Clayton Lockett’s execution didn’t go according to plan. He suffered and it took a few extra minutes for him to die of lethal injection.

But he was there on the gurney because he intentionally caused suffering.

In 1999 he killed a 19-year-old woman named Stephanie Nieman.

According to her family, she was a thoughtful young woman who helped out with kids and with her church.

Stephanie Neiman_1398864329403_4305501_ver1.0_640_480

Clayton Lockett and his pal shot her and then buried her alive and let her die.

Lockett filled Stephanie’s last moments on earth with horror and pain. She suffered and died for no reason at all.

Lockett is no victim. He suffered because of his own actions.

His soul is for God to deal with, but I see no reason to spend any time agonizing over him. In fact, if more would-be killers feared that they would suffer even a fraction as much as their victims do, we would surely have fewer victims to mourn.

Bryan Preston has been a leading conservative blogger and opinionator since founding his first blog in 2001. Bryan is a military veteran, worked for NASA, was a founding blogger and producer at Hot Air, was producer of the Laura Ingraham Show and, most recently before joining PJM, was Communications Director of the Republican Party of Texas.

Comments are closed.

Top Rated Comments   
I wonder if there are elements invested in botching capital punishments, deliberately. After all, if the intention is death, you don't have to finesse the dosage.

The real benefit of the entire argument for capital punishment is being able to look you child in the eye and saying: "that bad man can not hurt anybody ever again, I promise".

The Left does not like that argument.
20 weeks ago
20 weeks ago Link To Comment
Botched is a technical term meaning he didn't die as quickly and peacefully as the bleeding hearts would like.

If the states would just quit trying to render death painless for felons like Lockett, and go back to using the more dignified firing squad, or the more appropriate hangman's noose, we wouldn't be hearing all these so-called "horror" stories.
20 weeks ago
20 weeks ago Link To Comment
botched how? he's dead.

i really do not care about the rest.
20 weeks ago
20 weeks ago Link To Comment
All Comments   (71)
All Comments   (71)
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All this bellyaching and handwringing over this killer is making me sick. Just as a reminder the murdering scumbag shot this young lady and then, while she was still alive, buried her in her grave. Nice guy, huh??? All the doodads and innovations in "humane" execution are just a bunch of BS; tie him to a stake with a target taped to his shirt over his heart. Have ten marksmen line up and shoot him to death. He'll be dead before he hears the crack of the rifles. Easy, fast and inexpensive. I'll bet there would be plenty of volunteers for the firing squad.
20 weeks ago
20 weeks ago Link To Comment
Okay, but I am hung up on the fact that he did it in 1999 - and is just now getting the proper treatment, regardless of the medicine.
20 weeks ago
20 weeks ago Link To Comment
Okay, so I don't really care if this guy suffered, although it sounds like he was pretty unconscious, but why do we go through all this Rube Goldberg crap? Hanging is undependable, the electric chair is pretty quick but prone to malfunction. The gas chamber is dangerous to the spectators, the guards and the coroner.

Just shoot them in the head.

Electrical chemical impulses in the brain propagate at around 300mph, a rifle round like they use in China, or a high caliber pistol round as in Russia travel faster than that, it's humane, assured and fast. You can finish an execution less than a minute after taking the condemned from the cell. With lethal injection there is all this absurd prep and screwing around. It takes an hour and it makes the condemned look like some kind of martyr. Just shoot them and be done with it.
20 weeks ago
20 weeks ago Link To Comment
"Hanging is undependable, "

In what universe? It's got a track record of hundreds of years of reliability.

Yes, it's possible to screw it up, but that's true of anything.

20 weeks ago
20 weeks ago Link To Comment
Execution via firing squad is best, IMO, because it's quick & efficient. Death is rendered in a sudden, lights-out fashion. Most humane.
20 weeks ago
20 weeks ago Link To Comment
Howdy Mark v
Hanging is dependably fast and even humane when done correctly. But it's often visually messy.
Given how long it's been in the US (18 years), we'd have to issue an H1B (I think it is) visa to bring in a foreign expert.
There's a lot to be said for the equine method: shot to the head. Gary Larson had a marvelous cartoon about the hospital for horses...
20 weeks ago
20 weeks ago Link To Comment
Well, if people are worried about the mess, I guess my idea of a pneumatically powered guillotine is right out.

There was that sicko artist who proposed a mile-high roller coaster that ended in a series of loops that maintained 10+g acceleration long enough to guarantee brain death, but I think the same thing could be accomplished with a centrifuge.

The real trick is a method that still leaves the body suitable for organ donation.
20 weeks ago
20 weeks ago Link To Comment
I'd like to see some outrage over the botched execution of Sarah Brown. After two attempts at lethal injection, she was left blind, mute, and unable to walk. It took her five years to die.

She wasn't given a trial or due process. She was aborted at 36 weeks by "hero" George Tiller.

http://realchoice.blogspot.kr/2014/04/two-botched-executions.html
20 weeks ago
20 weeks ago Link To Comment
Which is why no one even slightly sane has any tolerance for late term abortion.

I'd like to see us concentrate on that like a laser beam until it doesn't happen in the US at all. There is massive support for making it illegal. You have 95% of the people agreeing with you as soon as the technique is described.

Just for a few months drop everything else and get this flat out banned. People on both sides of this issue (for earlier term abortions) need to see a real logical debate take place and bear fruit. It will make settling all the rest easier.
20 weeks ago
20 weeks ago Link To Comment
It's not likely to happen due to the dirty little secret few are brave enough to mention: Some in high places don't want to see certain groups' populations grow into too large a number for their tender sensibilities. And these people have the nerve to call conservatives racists & bigots.
20 weeks ago
20 weeks ago Link To Comment
The same people who are always crying about "Cruel and Unusual Punishment" are the same folks who have no problem aborting innocent babies. Strange!!
20 weeks ago
20 weeks ago Link To Comment
Yeah, why don't they look at the botched lethal injection of Sarah Smith? She wasn't sedated. The drugs were injected directly into her brain, leaving her blind, mentally disabled, unable to walk or talk. It took her FIVE YEARS to die. She didn't get a trial, didn't get an appeal, didn't get any due process at all.

Her crime was just being in the wrong place at the wrong time. But there was no outcry about whether Dr. George Tiller should keep using that lethal injection method in his late-term "health of the mother" abortions.

http://realchoice.blogspot.kr/2014/04/two-botched-executions.html
20 weeks ago
20 weeks ago Link To Comment
No sympathy for Lockett. He got what he deserved.
20 weeks ago
20 weeks ago Link To Comment
He's terminated. End of story. Who cares if he suffered because he tortured another human being to death intentionally. Anyone who cries out for Stalinist "reform" of the death penalty is an idiot and should be shamed for ignoring the slaughter of a young woman to advance a political agenda.
20 weeks ago
20 weeks ago Link To Comment
I'd like to see all murderer's killed in the same way they killed their victims.
20 weeks ago
20 weeks ago Link To Comment
The problem here is that the executed criminal had, just before this, made a court challenge questioning the drugs to be used.
Worse, when the Supreme Court of Oklahoma granted a stay to consider the appeal, the Governor of Oklahoma got bent out of shape and postured about ordering the execution to proceed anyway.
Worse still, when the Supreme Court of Oklahoma decided there were no grounds to make the challenge and lifted the stay, legislators in Oklahoma postured about impeaching the justices who had granted the stay.
And now, lo and behold! there was a problem with the execution.
So it is not merely that a criminal died in agony, but that the entire justice system and political system have made themselves look like complete incompetents and fools who simply cannot be trusted to impose the death penalty.

Compounding that is the rush to express disdain not merely for the suffering of the criminal, but for the very principal at work that stands against it. Crying about justice and law and order is so absurd and hypocritical as to utterly undermine any legitimacy for the death penalty itself when done in clear defiance of the constitutional prohibition on cruel and unusual punishment. That was instituted precisely to do away with such excessive deaths, no matter the crime that resulted in the sentence.
Such hypocrisies are worthy only of "progressives" who like to preen about how things like extra-judicial sexual abuse enact a "true" punishment superior to the death penalty, even while whining about how many "innocent" people are "mistakenly" and "unjustly" put to death.
The pretense that the serial rape of the innocent is morally superior to the judicial murder of the innocent is matched for hypocrisy only by those preening about the torture-execution of the criminally depraved who turn around and whine about police state traffic stops and searches.
Disparage one explicitly guaranteed right, particularly one involving life and death, and you lose any standing to legitimately criticize other explicitly guaranteed rights involving mere identification and privacy.

It is not a question of having sympathy, any or excessive, for an executed criminal.
It is a question of having sympathy for the Rule of Law and the Constitution in the face of disdain expressed by both opponents and erstwhile supporters.
20 weeks ago
20 weeks ago Link To Comment
There is nothing unconstitutional about capital punishment per se. "Cruel and Unusual Punishment" referred to acts such as drawing and quartering. Lethal injections, even "botched" ones are not cruel in comparison to the barbarities of the 18th century, or hangings, for that matter.

In a society that has rampant abortion, including late-term (i.e., actual infanticide) abortions, and where there is more and more talk of euthanizing the very old and the very ill, showing excessive sympathy for monsters that society chooses to dispatch after a lengthy trial and appeals process is the actual act of depravity by modern, "progressive" society.
20 weeks ago
20 weeks ago Link To Comment
I never said there was anything unconstitutional about capital punishment per se. In fact quite the opposite.

However, botched executions, without the cutesy quotation marks, if taken as a standard, are in fact cruel, some even in comparison to the barbarities of the 18th century.

Meanwhile, we aren't talking about abortion, or euthanasia, and I expressed no sympathy, excessive or otherwise, for the executed criminal. So while those are certainly nice strawmen, they have nothing to do with the point I was addressing.
20 weeks ago
20 weeks ago Link To Comment
Crying about justice and law and order is so absurd and hypocritical as to utterly undermine any legitimacy for the death penalty itself when done in clear defiance of the constitutional prohibition on cruel and unusual punishment. That was instituted precisely to do away with such excessive deaths, no matter the crime that resulted in the sentence."

Please explain to us the meaning of "excessive deaths". I'm sure we're all dying to understand that expression.

While you are at it, please explain the connection (apparently made by some) between some cretin having a heart attack while being executed, and "cruel and unusual punishment". I'm pretty sure most of us don't see any connection. Perhaps you can enlighten us.

Please be sure your response includes an explanation of how a ban on "cruel and unusual punishment", written by men who approved of public flogging, and favored public hanging as the appropriate method of capital punishment, came to be regarded as a guarantee of "absolutley pain and drama free executions".

20 weeks ago
20 weeks ago Link To Comment
Excessive - putting someone to death by means of drugs that induce a bursting of a vein, over a period of 40 minutes.
There is something unclear about that description that does not qualify as "excessive" to you?
Or how inducing death by burst vein and pain causing a heart attack that doesn't constitute "cruel and unusual"?
If you really need to be enlightened then the task of doing so is clearly impossible.

As for how approving public flogging and hanging is different from drug induced destruction of the circulatory system, which is the question at hand, and not your puerile strawman of "absolutely pain and drama free executions", it is inherent in the very words used "cruel and unusual" and the ban applied to it.
Put to death, yes.
Tortured to death, no.
A difficult concept to be sure, but clearly one that evades many.
20 weeks ago
20 weeks ago Link To Comment
I don't think there is any information about a "burst vein." The offender did cut his arm to try to make the execution more difficult; he also had to be restrained.

One has to ask if the theatrics at the execution were more efforts to pretend that the process was excruciating prior to unconsciousness. -- as activists are trained to do for the cameras as soon as a police officer touches them, for example. His supporters were among the "witnesses" being quoted in the media. They are unreliable.

Was he tortured to death? No. Did he feel pain? Maybe. If so, it is entirely the fault of anti-Death Penalty activists who created this situation by making it impossible for states to use tried methods.


20 weeks ago
20 weeks ago Link To Comment
Read the link, it is right there.

If it takes so long to die, it creates a very real question as to whether he was tortured to death.

No, it is not entirely the fault of the anti-Death Penalty activists.
No matter the crimes of others, "Caesar's wife must be above suspicion."
20 weeks ago
20 weeks ago Link To Comment
"Excessive - putting someone to death by means of drugs that induce a bursting of a vein, over a period of 40 minutes.
There is something unclear about that description that does not qualify as "excessive" to you?"


Well, yes, I did find it unclear, but then, English is my native language. Sorry, I assumed the same was true for you.

Perhaps you should consider enrolling in an adult ESL class.

You are dismissed.


20 weeks ago
20 weeks ago Link To Comment
Then while English may be your native language, clearly your are not proficient in it.

Perhaps you should consider enrolling in an adult Literacy Program.

You are irrelevant.
20 weeks ago
20 weeks ago Link To Comment
Do you have citations, or just a whining streak, incoherent at best?
20 weeks ago
20 weeks ago Link To Comment
Citations?
There are plenty here.

Do you have a rebuttal, or just a whining streak, irrelevant at best?
20 weeks ago
20 weeks ago Link To Comment
"There are plenty here."

Apparently you are not clear on the meaning of "citation", either.

You really need that ESL class.

20 weeks ago
20 weeks ago Link To Comment
Again, clearly you are not up on proficiency and are in severe need of that literacy class.
20 weeks ago
20 weeks ago Link To Comment
You need help.
20 weeks ago
20 weeks ago Link To Comment
The prison should have been equipped with an 'emergency frying pan' to be applied swiftly and forcefully to the accused's noggin once it became clear the other method of execution was running into difficulty.

I think this guy's ordeal is karmic payback for his manner of killing the victim. She was reportedly shot once, then the accused fiddled with the shotgun to fix something which broke, then he shot the victim again.
20 weeks ago
20 weeks ago Link To Comment
Ironically, a 25 cal. bullet to the back of the skull may be the most "humane" method of execution. I'm not advocating it, but the dispatch, when done expertly, is supposed to be the most efficient method of killing, execution style. Death is almost always instantaneous. If, hypothetically, this method were chosen, sedating, even anesthetizing, the condemned person would make the process even more "humane," if you will.
20 weeks ago
20 weeks ago Link To Comment
Nyet. A .25 is just not reliable at penetrating skulls. A .22 would be better. Even better would be a .22 magnum.

But then, why make it so complicated? Hanging is very reliable and simple.

20 weeks ago
20 weeks ago Link To Comment
Totally. The condemned could be strapped into a chair which carefully placed his head exactly where they wanted it. He would be restrained in place. The kill shot would never miss; a hollow point to the brain stem. I think we want to use a .45 though, more bang for the buck.
20 weeks ago
20 weeks ago Link To Comment
"more bang for the buck."

Okay, you go sit in the corner for 30 minutes!


;-)

20 weeks ago
20 weeks ago Link To Comment
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