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by
Bryan Preston

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August 5, 2013 - 8:08 am
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Philip Rucker leads the Post today with a story about a study that claims there is a “vast” gun market thriving online that allows gun buyers to evade the background check system. Rucker’s story is full of misleading statements.

The marketplace for firearms on the Internet, where buyers are not required to undergo background checks, is so vast that advocates for stricter regulations now consider online sales a greater threat than the gun show loophole.

Misleading statement #1: Buyers are only not required to undergo background checks if they’re not buying from a licensed firearms dealer. If you buy online from a licensed dealer, you still have to undergo a background check.

Misleading statement #2: Advocates for stricter regulations are always looking for a new angle from which to chip away at the Second Amendment. They author studies that support their point of view, then act shocked! and demand more regulations. That’s how gun-control advocacy works.

A new study by Third Way , a centrist think tank with close ties to the Obama administration, found that thousands of guns, including so-called assault weapons, are for sale online and that many prospective buyers were shopping online specifically to avoid background checks.

Misleading statement #3: If the group has “close ties to the Obama administration,” it is not “centrist.”

Misleading statement #4: On the question of buyers shopping online to avoid background checks, that’s probably true, but there are many reasons that buyers may want to avoid the background check system besides the obvious one — their being convicted felons or others barred from buying guns. Recent scandals involving how the government uses and misuses personal data highlight just one of those reasons.

The study focused on Armslist.com — a popular classified site similar to Craigslist.org that facilitates private sales of firearms and ammunition based on location — and analyzed listings in 10 states where senators voted against a background checks compromise this spring.

At any given time, more than 15,000 guns were for sale in those states, according to the study, and more than 5,000 of them were semi-automatic weapons. Nearly 2,000 ads were from prospective buyers asking to buy specifically from private sellers, where no background checks are required.

Why break out “semi-automatic weapons” from others? Because in many minds on the left, semi-automatic weapons are somehow more powerful than non-semi-autos. They’re not, of course.

Background checks — designed to keep guns out of the hands of convicted felons, domestic violence perpetrators or the severely mentally ill — are mandatory for gun sales at retail stores, but not at gun shows or for private sales, such as between neighbors and family members.

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Top Rated Comments   
Federal law prohibits the federal government from retaining records of gun purchasers so that no "confiscation lists" can be compiled, but gun owners assume that law is being ignored. Given recent revelations about the IRS, DOJ, and NSA, this is not an unwarranted assumption.

So that is another reason an otherwise innocent person might want to avoid a background check. If the government is ignoring the law, why should citizens feel obligated to abide by it? The Obama regime has destroyed the rule of law, and the the inevitable result is that no one trusts the government.
36 weeks ago
36 weeks ago Link To Comment
Firearms shipped between states cannot be delivered to an individual, only to a licensed dealer who must do the same background check that a gun store does before turning over the gun to the buyer.
36 weeks ago
36 weeks ago Link To Comment
I've seen Armslist when researching some prices for used hunting rifles. I've seen some of the ads the group described. Someone posting a vague "want to buy" type ad but only emphasizing person-to-person or flat out stating they don't want to do a background check in states where it is required. The rest of the ad only hints they want some gun (usually handgun since most often that requires the check), but never specific about what type. The ad usually ends with another vague statement about being pro-second amendment.

I always assumed the ads was planted by some wannabe activist or journalist wanting to make a story about how easy it is to violate the law. It's always the buyer asking the seller to violate the law.
36 weeks ago
36 weeks ago Link To Comment
All Comments   (13)
All Comments   (13)
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just before I looked at the draft ov $9220, I did not believe that my friend was like realie bringing in money parttime from there new laptop.. there brothers friend had bean doing this 4 only 13 months and just now cleard the mortgage on there villa and bourt a gorgeous Lotus Elise. we looked here.. http://www.cnn13.com
36 weeks ago
36 weeks ago Link To Comment
36 weeks ago
36 weeks ago Link To Comment
Perhaps when Jeff Bezos takes over the WaPo, he can fill Philip Rucker in on how internet sales work, not just on guns, but on a lot of regulated product.
Of course, that would destroy Teh Narrative, would it not.
36 weeks ago
36 weeks ago Link To Comment
To expect the left to tell the truth about guns is to believe that pigs will fly. They don't, and they won't.

In this regard, just as the sun rises and sets, so too the left goes postal, regarding LEGAL gun ownership - http://adinakutnicki.com/2013/01/03/leftists-go-postal-over-gun-control-threatening-to-kill-legal-gun-owners-commentary-by-adina-kutnicki/

NOTHING new under the sun....

Adina Kutnicki, Israel http://adinakutnicki.com/about/
36 weeks ago
36 weeks ago Link To Comment
There is also the classified ad "loophole", the club bulletin board "loophole", and the neighbors talking to each other "loophole".
36 weeks ago
36 weeks ago Link To Comment
Something that just came out in the great gun control debate that will likely never see the light of day in any liberal publication is that gun sales in Virginia have substantially increased while the rate of violent crime has substantially decreased. Imagine that. An armed society is a polite society. http://www.breitbart.com/Big-Government/2013/08/04/Violent-Crime-Drops-As-Gun-Sales-Rise-In-Virginia
36 weeks ago
36 weeks ago Link To Comment
Federal law prohibits the federal government from retaining records of gun purchasers so that no "confiscation lists" can be compiled, but gun owners assume that law is being ignored. Given recent revelations about the IRS, DOJ, and NSA, this is not an unwarranted assumption.

So that is another reason an otherwise innocent person might want to avoid a background check. If the government is ignoring the law, why should citizens feel obligated to abide by it? The Obama regime has destroyed the rule of law, and the the inevitable result is that no one trusts the government.
36 weeks ago
36 weeks ago Link To Comment
Firearms shipped between states cannot be delivered to an individual, only to a licensed dealer who must do the same background check that a gun store does before turning over the gun to the buyer.
36 weeks ago
36 weeks ago Link To Comment
That is correct for all firearms covered under Gun Control Act of 1968. Likewise residents of different states may not legally transfer firearms even face to face without a Federal Firearms licensee.

Some state laws are more restrictive, to no measurable benefit.
36 weeks ago
36 weeks ago Link To Comment
I've seen Armslist when researching some prices for used hunting rifles. I've seen some of the ads the group described. Someone posting a vague "want to buy" type ad but only emphasizing person-to-person or flat out stating they don't want to do a background check in states where it is required. The rest of the ad only hints they want some gun (usually handgun since most often that requires the check), but never specific about what type. The ad usually ends with another vague statement about being pro-second amendment.

I always assumed the ads was planted by some wannabe activist or journalist wanting to make a story about how easy it is to violate the law. It's always the buyer asking the seller to violate the law.
36 weeks ago
36 weeks ago Link To Comment
Most assume such to be undercover law enforcement. Not sure anyone is fooled.
36 weeks ago
36 weeks ago Link To Comment
Or another type of criminal. Generally, if you get a bad vibe, stay away.
36 weeks ago
36 weeks ago Link To Comment
That was the first reaction when I saw it: Looking for "a handgun" and asking for a buyer to not ask questions. However, the pro-second amendment stuff looked out of place and forced. Like someone trying too hard to endear themselves to a community.

It just seemed really odd and different from the other ads, which made it stand out in my memory.
36 weeks ago
36 weeks ago Link To Comment
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