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The PJ Tatler

by
Bridget Johnson

Bio

January 21, 2013 - 10:15 am

Sen. Robert Menendez (D-N.J.) said everyone should think about the Emancipation Proclamation on this inauguration day.

“Let us remember what it must have meant to every African-American then and what that moment of freedom and justice has come to represent in the long and troubled history of race relations in this nation. Let us also remember that, 100 years after Abraham Lincoln issued the Emancipation Proclamation, Martin Luther King stood on the steps of the Lincoln Memorial and looked down the Mall at thousands of faces, black and white, men and women, young and old, standing together for the cause of freedom,” Menendez said in a statement.

“Now, 150 years to the month after Abraham Lincoln issued the Emancipation Proclamation and just under 50 years after Martin Luther King stood on those steps in Lincoln’s ‘symbolic shadow’, we are about to swear-in the first black President in our nation’s history to a second term. We carry on the cause that every American always be a full-American, a full-citizen, judged not by the ‘the color of their skin but the content of their character’ and that they be given all the rights and liberties afforded by the Constitution,” he continued.

“Abraham Lincoln freed African-Americans from the shameful shackles of slavery. Dr. King led them out of the lingering shadows of segregation and the oppressive yoke of Jim Crow toward a future of hope and a promise of freedom and equality.  Every year at this time we remember their lives and legacies all over again and are keenly aware that the task of freedom has fallen to us.  Indeed, it is up to us to make King’s dream a reality.  And on this day, let us carry forward on our righteous march towards equality and justice.”

Republican lawmakers sent out their own messages on MLK Day and the inauguration, but didn’t mix the two.

“I congratulate President Obama for taking his second oath of office for the Presidency of the United States,” said conservative Rep. Steve King (R-Iowa). “To ‘preserve, protect and defend the Constitution of the United States’ is a promise not to be taken lightly, and one that may require refreshing.”

Bridget Johnson is a career journalist whose news articles and opinion columns have run in dozens of news outlets across the globe. Bridget first came to Washington to be online editor at The Hill, where she wrote The World from The Hill column on foreign policy. Previously she was an opinion writer and editorial board member at the Rocky Mountain News and nation/world news columnist at the Los Angeles Daily News. She has contributed to USA Today, The Wall Street Journal, National Review Online, Politico and more, and has myriad television and radio credits as a commentator. Bridget is Washington Editor for PJ Media.
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