Get PJ Media on your Apple

The PJ Tatler

Fort Hood Massacre: Taxpayers Pay Again for Government Infringement of Second Amendment

Hasan’s victims sue government, which means we foot the bill.

by
Howard Nemerov

Bio

November 13, 2011 - 6:47 am

Flashback: In 2009, Nidal Hasan killed 13 people and wounded 31 others at Ford Hood. His shooting rampage was assisted by superiors’ ban on personnel bearing arms outside of official training. Hood was a target-rich, gun-free zone, and Americans suffered for it.

 

Yesterday, it was reported that victims of the massacre are “asking compensation totaling $750 million from the government for failing to stop the attack.”

Let’s examine this concept.

“Suing the government” is a euphemism for extracting money from taxpayers via tort. As Abraham Lincoln said: “This country, with its institutions, belongs to the people who inhabit it.”

We are the government, like it or not.

Yes, the government “failed to stop the attack,” and those whose decisions led to this horror should answer as accessories to murder. But the government has no duty to protect, and therefore isn’t responsible for failing to stop an attack, even though we still have to pay for all these “services” that aren’t beholden to us. (See Castle Rock v. Gonzalez and Deshaney v. Winnebago for starters.) So while the Supreme Court could throw this out, the taxpayers still foot a legal bill at the very least.

Returning to the main issue: The government–which orders soldiers to use military weaponry to kill enemies identified as such by the government–doesn’t trust these same people to responsibly bear arms on base. In America. All paid for by American taxpayers who live in country with a Bill of Rights specifically acknowledging the God-given right of self-defense via the Second Amendment.

As with all the school shootings in the last two decades, government infringement created a “gun-free zone” which benefited one murderer bent upon maximizing his statement defined as body count.

In any case, the bottom line is that we pay for government’s failed policies in many ways, while those enacting those policies suffer no consequences. The rest of Lincoln’s quote is:

Whenever they shall grow weary of the existing government, they can exercise their constitutional right of amending it, or exercise their revolutionary right to overthrow it.

So what’s it going to be? Or will we just put yokes on our own necks?

Former civilian disarmament supporter and medical researcher Howard Nemerov investigates the civil liberty of self-defense and examines the issue of gun control, resulting in his book Four Hundred Years of Gun Control: Why Isn’t It Working? He appears frequently on NRA News as their “unofficial” analyst and was published in the Texas Review of Law and Politics with David Kopel and Carlisle Moody.
Click here to view the 7 legacy comments

Comments are closed.