A grammar expert isn’t impressed with the Lightworker in Chief’s command of English. Either that, or the expert is a hopeless raaacist.

“The first wordsmith is, in fact, an occasional stem-winder who is grammatically challenged,” says author and Harvard-educated historian William Proctor, who pored over 3,000 pages of the president’s official speeches and remarks. He’s convinced that Americans — particularly students — can learn a little something from Mr. Obama.

“His speeches reveal that at this point, he is simply not in the same rhetorical-grammatical league as a Thomas Jefferson, Abraham Lincoln, Franklin D. Roosevelt, John F. Kennedy or Ronald Reagan,” Mr. Proctor says. “Even as we explore Mr. Obama’s errors, we should not lapse into smug, finger-pointing complacency. His mistakes should serve as a reminder to the rest of us that we, too, may need to clean up our technical language skills.”

Frankly, I’m shocked that anyone would question the intellect of the man who has visited 57 states, praises Abe Lincoln for building the intercontinental railroad and has publicly praised our Navy’s brave corpse-men.