First, remember that Acting ATF Director Kenneth Melson met with congressional investigators Congressman Darrell Issa and Senator Charles Grassley last July 4 to discuss Fast and Furious, against DOJ recommendations. In a letter to Eric Holder, they noted that his “cooperation was extremely helpful to our investigation.”

Next, remember that two ATF agents who were less than forthcoming during a congressional hearing were recently promoted.

Now, understand that Melson wasn’t “fired.” He was “reassigned” from running the ATF “to the position of senior adviser on forensic science in the Department of Justice’s Office of Legal Programs.”

“Senior advisor”? For those who’ve worked in the corporate environment, there was a special place for people who couldn’t be fired outright. Upper management would perform one of their “reorganizations” and give said person a “promotion” to manager of “special projects.” Curiously, this position never had any subordinate positions. They were a kind of “advisor” who may or may not be consulted on any issue. Heh, heh.

Next, Holder needed a fall guy somewhere in the main DOJ hierarchy:

In Phoenix, Assistant U.S. Attorney Emory Hurley, who oversaw Fast and Furious on a day-to-day basis, was reassigned from the criminal to civil division.

And of course, let no good deed go unpunished:

Also in Phoenix, three out of the four whistleblowers involved in the case have been reassigned to new positions outside Arizona. Two are headed to Florida, one to South Carolina.

Holder probably hopes throwing people under the bus will satisfy investigators that “something is being done.” Hold your representative’s feet to the fire until they give Holder the four “I”s: Investigate, indict, impeach, imprison.