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by
Amy Holmes

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March 1, 2011 - 8:02 am

This morning on Talk Radio Network’s nationally syndicated, “America’s Morning News,” Sir Ben Kingsley offered some wise words on the pitfalls of fame.

The A-list actor, Oscar winner, and two time Golden Globe winner, explained to John McCaslin and Amy Holmes that when it comes to celebrity crack ups, “A lot lies in delusion, and life not being able to live up to the expectations that the delusion tells you you ought to live up to.” Kingsley, who has played such luminaries as Gandhi and Moses, and famously starred in the Holocaust drama “Schindler’s List,” suggested that, “if a young actor fully understands his or her role as a story teller in society, rather than a celebrity, they’d be much more grounded.”

Are you listening, Lindsay?  Dina?  Michael?

While Sir Kinglsey hasn’t watched the very public unraveling of the “Two and Half Men” star — he says, “it’s like looking through a peephole. It’s too personal, too private” — he does wish the actor well.   And he offers the sympathetic words that, “We all have our demons. We all struggle with them.”

Now, if only Charlie Sheen would accept that his “epic” meltdown is not, in fact, “winning.”

See sound attached and transcript below.  Please credit Talk Radio Network’s “America’s Morning News.”

America’s Morning News

Tuesday, March 1, 2011

co-hosted by John McCaslin and Amy Holmes

Holmes: Well, Mr. Kingsley, before you go, we do have to ask you: Have you been watching Charlie Sheen and what seems to be an unraveling personality?

Kingsley: No. No, I have not.

Holmes: You haven’t watched any of it? Because, I think of Anthony Hopkins who said recently that he thinks that superstar… that human beings are not built to withstand superstar fame. Do you agree with that?

Kingsley: Well, Sir Anthony’s right and he has had his struggles. And I respect him deeply. And my only theory is that if a young actor is trained in theater and if a young actor fully understands his or her role as a story teller in society rather than a celebrity, they’d be much more grounded. I think that a lot lies in delusion, and life not being able to live up to the expectations that the delusion tells you you ought to live up to. So, Sir Anthony put it beautifully, and I think he’s a lovely clever man.

We all have our demons, we all struggle with them. I have not watched Mr. Sheen’s struggle. To me, it’s like looking through a peephole. It’s too personal, too private. I wish him well.

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