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Belmont Club

The Weekend Post

August 23rd, 2014 - 5:29 pm

This is an “extra Belmont Club post” for readers who are having a slow day. The video below takes some time to watch. But it is entertaining. It’s a presentation by a tester of Healthcare.gov, named Ben Simo, before it was rolled out.

Doubtless some of the problems he talks about have been fixed. But it does strongly suggest that when they rolled the Obamacare site out it wasn’t really ready for prime time.

One of the funniest moments comes when Simo tries to tell his employers about all the security problems he’s encountered and they advise him to call the Federal Trade Commission to report it. When Simo says that might not be appropriate they ask him to call the local police or the FBI. It’s funny until you realize the same mentality is protecting you from ISIS.

Those looking for something more substantial might want to read GK Chesterton’s The Ballad of the White Horse, which is about King Alfred the Great versus Guthrum the Dane. It is absolutely wonderful, and even though it is one of the longest epic poems in modern English, it is eminently readable. Chesterton’s virtuoso literary ability is chastening, for it stands as far above the average writer as the average writer stands above an illiterate. You will recognize many famous lines. One which you will have doubtless heard of is this bit about the Irish.

For the great Gaels of Ireland
Are the men that God made mad,
For all their wars are merry,
And all their songs are sad.

Ballad of the White Horse was one of sources of JRR Tolkien’s Lord of the Rings. One of my favorite passages is the part where Alfred comes upon an old woman in the wood. In that high forest, in the space before his secret army musters, the great Christian king realizes that heaven was made, not for earls but the homeless vagrant.

“But some see God like Guthrum,
Crowned, with a great beard curled,
But I see God like a good giant,
That, labouring, lifts the world.

“Wherefore was God in Golgotha,
Slain as a serf is slain;
And hate He had of prince and peer,
And love He had and made good cheer,
Of them that, like this woman here,
Go powerfully in pain.

“A star of nowhere, a nameless star,
A light that spins and swirls,
And cries that even in hedge and hill,
Even on earth, it may go ill
At last with the evil earls.

“A dancing sparkle, a doubtful star,
On the waste wind whirled and driven;
But it seems to sing of a wilder worth,
A time discrowned of doom and birth,
And the kingdom of the poor on earth
Come, as it is in heaven.

“But even though such days endure,
How shall it profit her?
Who shall go groaning to the grave,
With many a meek and mighty slave,
Field-breaker and fisher on the wave,
And woodman and waggoner.

“Bake ye the big world all again
A cake with kinder leaven;
Yet these are sorry evermore—
Unless there be a little door,
A little door in heaven.”

The forest scene was a powerful image which made me think of elves. And the elves made me think of the Welsh. And night and elves and woods naturally suggested this old tune as background for Alfred and the old woman.

In the coming battles the Danes were turned away. Yet the  fate of the newly scoured White Horse rings true also. For it was Chesterton’s idea that savagery would come again, the  second time in the guise of cynical sophistication, in the form of “slaves without a lord”.  It was perhaps a warning to our time; or it maybe to every time.  We are never safe until we reach the little door to heaven.

“I know that weeds shall grow in it
Faster than men can burn;
And though they scatter now and go,
In some far century, sad and slow,
I have a vision, and I know
The heathen shall return.

“They shall not come with warships,
They shall not waste with brands,
But books be all their eating,
And ink be on their hands.

“Not with the humour of hunters
Or savage skill in war,
But ordering all things with dead words,
Strings shall they make of beasts and birds,
And wheels of wind and star.

“What though they come with scroll and pen,
And grave as a shaven clerk,
By this sign you shall know them,
That they ruin and make dark;

“By all men bond to Nothing,
Being slaves without a lord,
By one blind idiot world obeyed,
Too blind to be abhorred”


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Top Rated Comments   
I got curious about the Battle of the Coral Sea and bough a book on it, Hoyt’s “Blue Skies and Blood.” There does not seem to have been much written about the battle, eclipsed as it was by Midway a month later, but here is a passage I read today, about what occurred when a bomb hit the USS Yorktown:

“Lt. Milton E. Ricketts was in charge of the repair party. When the bomb passed through that compartment he was badly wounded. He pulled himself up from the deck, and looked around. All his men were down, dead, wounded, or knocked out by the blast, and a fire was breaking out. He dragged himself forward, opened the valve of the fire plug nearby, led out as much of the fire hose as his strength would allow, and began playing a stream of water on the fire. Then, as it subsided, he dropped the hose and fell dead.”

Just a simple little act in a battle that people rarely think about, a man doing his job even as he died. On such foundations our civilization is built. For some people there is a door to Heaven, and some have the job of holding it open.
9 weeks ago
9 weeks ago Link To Comment
I could not access it. But when they opened the Holocaust Museum in DC, the very first day they brought in some of the men who had liberated the camps and honored them.

"We didn't do anything, " said one, "We just walked in through the gates."

And someone replied, "But what did you and your fellow soldiers have to go through to get that far?"

That was the right way to open that museum. Because no matter what men did there, other men came from far, far, away, and put a stop to it. And the act of stopping that horror was far, far, greater that the act of starting it.
9 weeks ago
9 weeks ago Link To Comment
So many riches here. Economics is the science of choice under conditions of scarcity. What is scarce in this world is Time. What is worth paying attention to? Old Doug chose wisely. The beauty in that girl's face makes a moment spent in recognizing it well spent, and the treasure spent to free her well spent.

Ben Simo was questioned by congressional staffers but not called to testify. Time is a scarce commodity and the staffers knew they could only apportion a precious appearance to those who would provide the most clear unnuanced dramatic theater. They had an expectation as to what an Authority would look and sound like. If Mr Simo had offered sneering contempt and haughty condescension with a good sound bite ready line they would have eaten it up. The weakness, a testable weakness, of selecting for the appearance of authority, the haircut and creased pants or the deliberately unkempt that equally shows a departure from the standards of the common man, is found in both government and the private sector. All human organizations are prone to fall for it.

Human history begins with the Fall when Eve fell for the slick talking snake. Our only hope is that if the web of associations are kept diverse then the market will weed out the charlatans. The more the system is simplified and unified under government control then the more vulnerable it will be to the appeal of a theatrical Authority.
9 weeks ago
9 weeks ago Link To Comment
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All Comments   (49)
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I hate to ruin Richard's excellent post (video was humous, and ironic) by going off-topic, but I loved this by Russ Vaughn.

"Can't Bomb Them into Submission?"
http://americanthinker.com/blog/2014/08/cant_bomb_them_into_submission.html

Unfortunately, he does go a bit "wobbly" at the end:

"Sadly, like so many other unused capabilities this great nation possesses, our heavy bombing assets will probably be kept on a tight leash by this dithering, incompetent loser in the White House that the Democrat party foisted on this nation and the world, an act of political treachery for which they should never be forgiven."

I'd have put it a bit more strongly, e.g. "tar and feather", "lamp posts in DC", etc.. All humor aside, his article is just outstanding.

re: "Wobbly": I just had to look up this quote by Margaret Thatcher to G.H.W. Bush: "Remember George, this is no time to go wobbly." Were only she the PM of Britain today, think of the kind words she could share with President Obama.

I heard a "talking head" on Fox (some GOP "RINO") who said that what we really needed was a national draft, so that all American's would share the burden of the next war. I've heard Democrats suggest the same thing. What imbeciles, as they more or less implicate the service of American armed forces in the current world morass. They are suggesting that the problem was with the quality or motivation of the American soldier, Marine, Airman, and sailor. Nothing could be further from the truth.

America vets (as well as active duty military) have witnessed an American President, supported by large proportions of Americas, simply piss away everything their blood, sweat, and tears has secured for this country over the past 11 years. We've seen him enlarge our military presence in the non-strategic hinterlands of Afghanistan, while emasculating our military mission through restrictive ROE's which had them fighting the enemy at a WWI, trench-warfare level.

Obama, plain and simple, gave a way the store and got a whole new generation of men killed for nothing other than his political viability. Iraq was the "wrong war" and Afghanistan the "good war", and every action Obama takes and every inaction, is constrained by the philosophy that took him into office. The American military man is the best of any in history, period. We don't need a draft. We DO NEED leadership, and a coherent foreign and military policy that Americans back. Who wants to go back to fighting an endless battle absent most of the fiercest tools in our arsenal, only to die for nothing because the next CINC enables the enemy, and gives away the peace and freedom you died for.

ISIS is unbeatable? Any man or woman that makes that statement is ignorant, a mentally unstable ideologue, or both. Declare Syrian and Iraq Territory now held by ISIS as an open war zone. Setup refugee centers at key points on the outskirts, and protect lanes from population centers back to those refugee centers for civilian evacuation. Screen the refugees for ISIS members, or any man or woman who profiles as a Islamic terrorists. Segregate the suspects to separate camps, and "interview" them. Build an intelligence database from the interviews, and 90% of the ISIS plants will be discovered.

Meanwhile, bomb the enemy at their concentration points. Bomb water, oil, and food. Blockade the outside edges of the war zone. Institute a summary death penalty for anyone running the blockade, and post a notice to sovereign states that direct or indirect support of ISIS or related groups within the "killbox" constitutes an active of war, which will realize immediate consequences.

Heavy handed? Yes, that's what unrestricted warfare looks like. Establish a killbox and then kill the enemy, starve them, dehydrate them, remove every form of transportation other than sandals, and then take them away, too. Kill the enemy, and if any surrender, put them into camps run by "Sheriff Joe", necessities of life and nothing else except 120 degree heat. Then find out from the insurgents who the war criminals are, and try them for international war crimes.

The only problem with American foreign and military policy over the past dozen years was the lack of consequences. Is Qatar actually supporting ISIS? Draft Dick Cheney to have a "come to God" moment with the Emir. If Qatar refuses to join the ranks of civilized nations, then the US bases there become sovereign US territory overnight, while Qatar becomes a free fire zone, i.e. another extension of the kill box.

ISIS is that rare, excellent opportunity that a country with a strong leader can use to explain to 100 other "bad guy" nations and entities out there, that while the USA will play by the rules, we won't be restrained by the possibility that we might kill the innocents you are using for human shields. We will find you, we will kill you, and we will keep killing you until you surrender and enter hell on this earth in con
9 weeks ago
9 weeks ago Link To Comment
Winning Wars is Politically Incorrect.
9 weeks ago
9 weeks ago Link To Comment
I'm always so "yesterday".
9 weeks ago
9 weeks ago Link To Comment
Seems to happen to those of us blessed to have lived in the "old days."

wrt my comment below regarding shell shock, I wonder how much the better outcomes for returning vets were in those days than today was due to the fact that they were not always fighting under insane ROIs, and got to return to a sane, appreciative, healthy, supportive culture instead of the present madness that greets today's vets?
(sorry for the garbled grammar, but I've got to get back to chores)
9 weeks ago
9 weeks ago Link To Comment
In regards to the photos, one of my high school classmate's father had the same gaunt, far away look. I didn't find out until much later that has was a highly decorated B-17 pilot who had several planes shot to pieces and lived to tell about it, except that he didn't talk about it at all.

The burdens we carry sometimes are unknown to all but a very few. I always try to keep that in mind, especially when dealing with folks of a certain age.
9 weeks ago
9 weeks ago Link To Comment
Can't recall the book on the Liberation. The writer said it was unfair to praise those who happened to be driiving down a road and happening on a camp. Which, as it happened, is what some of the initial encounters were.
The writer's view was that any man who set foot on the continent was a liberator. Maybe he was a clerk at Army HQ. Maybe he was killed in front of Maastricht, burned to death in a bomber over Bavaria someplace.
The honesty and humility of those old guys is...eminently predictable. They're American soldiers.
9 weeks ago
9 weeks ago Link To Comment
Noticed the picture of the Jewish Girl was no longer available due to a no hot links policy, and while searching for it came across these comments:

"I've never been so aware that there's a skull under your face."
---
"It's a sign how much she must have starved.
The fat in the face is the one that's reduced last in a "diet""


The photo:

http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-03pWL7K2Zkc/U_smlAHwdTI/AAAAAAAAAnk/_8yy99mm5mg/s1600/JewishGirl.jpg
9 weeks ago
9 weeks ago Link To Comment
http://www.yadvashem.org/yv/en/holocaust/about/03/daily_life_gallery.asp

--that's not the 1500's, and it ain't Mars, either.
9 weeks ago
9 weeks ago Link To Comment
wrt Rex Reeders Ghost, above, didn't your dad fly in B-17's?
Did he largely avoid the ravages of what was then called "shell shock?"

Looking back on how many WWII Vets I grew up around, it's a testament to the human spirit how well they came out of it.
9 weeks ago
9 weeks ago Link To Comment
--yep, and thanks for remembering. Shot down in Feb '44, spent the rest of the war in Stalag Luft 1.
9 weeks ago
9 weeks ago Link To Comment
Closeup of the haunting stare of an emaciated American war prisoner as he lies on cot after his liberation from German prison camp by Allied forces. Taken in Limburg, Germany, 1945.

http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-HMV-q1RSkwE/U_sqdR_I7gI/AAAAAAAAAns/EcouNL_7HAc/s1600/POW.jpg

"The thousand-yard stare or two-thousand-yard stare is a phrase coined to describe the limp, unfocused gaze of a battle-weary soldier, but the symptom it describes may also be found among victims of other types of trauma.
A characteristic of post-traumatic stress disorder, the despondent stare reflects dissociation from trauma."
- Wiki
---
"No one ever told me that grief felt so much like fear. I am not afraid, but the sensation is like being afraid. The same fluttering in the stomach, the same restlessness, the yawning. I keep on swallowing. At other times it feels like being mildly drunk or concussed. There is a sort of invisible blanket between the world and me. I find it hard to take in what anyone says. Or perhaps, hard to want to take it in."

- C.S. Lewis, A Grief Observed
9 weeks ago
9 weeks ago Link To Comment
I got curious about the Battle of the Coral Sea and bough a book on it, Hoyt’s “Blue Skies and Blood.” There does not seem to have been much written about the battle, eclipsed as it was by Midway a month later, but here is a passage I read today, about what occurred when a bomb hit the USS Yorktown:

“Lt. Milton E. Ricketts was in charge of the repair party. When the bomb passed through that compartment he was badly wounded. He pulled himself up from the deck, and looked around. All his men were down, dead, wounded, or knocked out by the blast, and a fire was breaking out. He dragged himself forward, opened the valve of the fire plug nearby, led out as much of the fire hose as his strength would allow, and began playing a stream of water on the fire. Then, as it subsided, he dropped the hose and fell dead.”

Just a simple little act in a battle that people rarely think about, a man doing his job even as he died. On such foundations our civilization is built. For some people there is a door to Heaven, and some have the job of holding it open.
9 weeks ago
9 weeks ago Link To Comment
Why, if I were a kid, I would look to the brave souls watching over this administration as heroic role models too. Here are just a few to highlight:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WxQS280RgEA
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jay_Carney
http://www.whitehouse.gov/blog/author/Ben%20Rhodes
9 weeks ago
9 weeks ago Link To Comment
How Lieutenant Ford Saved His Ship

By the time he reached the Monterey’s pilothouse, the fighter planes in its hangar deck had begun slamming into one another as well as the bulkheads — “like pinballs,” Mr. Ford recalled 60 years later — and the collisions had ignited their gas tanks. The hangar deck of the Monterey had become a cauldron of aircraft fuel, and because of a quirk in its construction, the flames from the burning aircraft were sucked into the air intakes of the lower decks. As fires broke out below, Lieutenant Ford remembered the smoke he smelled when he’d bolted from his bunk.

Admiral Halsey had ordered Captain Ingersoll to abandon ship, and the Monterey was ablaze from stem to stern as Lieutenant Ford stood near the helm, awaiting his orders. “We can fix this,” Captain Ingersoll said, and with a nod from his skipper, Lieutenant Ford donned a gas mask and led a fire brigade below.

The winds of Manakoora

http://pjmedia.com/richardfernandez/2009/09/27/the-winds-of-manakoora/

http://www.nytimes.com/2006/12/28/opinion/28drury.html?ex=1324962000&en=18ce61fb552d665b&ei=5090&partner=rssuserland&emc=rss&_r=0
9 weeks ago
9 weeks ago Link To Comment
Brave men. You read about stuff like that, and wonder if it was you, would you be as dedicated, as brave, to do your duty unto death, to help save your ship?
To quote "Admiral Tarrant" from the 'Bridges at Toko-Ri', "where do we get such men?"
9 weeks ago
9 weeks ago Link To Comment
OT
That well known Right Wing Nutjob MoDo ( Maureen Dowd) goes all racist and unhinged about our saintly Dear Leader's (Praise be Obama) sublime golfing habits:

"FORE! Score? And seven trillion rounds ago, our forecaddies brought forth on this continent a new playground, conceived by Robert Trent Jones, and dedicated to the proposition that all men are created equal when it comes to spending as much time on the links as possible — even when it seems totally inappropriate, like moments after making a solemn statement condemning the grisly murder of a 40-year-old American journalist beheaded by ISIL.
I know reporters didn’t get a chance to ask questions, but I had to bounce. I had a 1 p.m. tee time at Vineyard Golf Club with Alonzo Mourning and a part-owner of the Boston Celtics. Hillary and I agreed when we partied with Vernon Jordan up here, hanging out with celebrities and rich folks is fun.
Now we are engaged in a great civil divide in Ferguson, which does not even have a golf course, and that’s why I had a “logistical” issue with going there. We are testing whether that community, or any community so conceived and so dedicated, can long endure when the nation’s leader wants nothing more than to sink a birdie putt.
We are met on a great field of that battle, not Augusta, not Pebble Beach, not Bethpage Black, not Burning Tree, but Farm Neck Golf Club in Martha’s Vineyard, which we can’t get enough of — me, Alonzo, Ray Allen and Marvin Nicholson, my trip director and favorite golfing partner who has played 134 rounds and counting with me."

Oh Wait! Mo Do is one of our elite anointed aristocracy! How can this be?
A racist diatribe from her? OMG

Just another example of the connected Dem Rats abandoning the sinking ship of SS Obama.
9 weeks ago
9 weeks ago Link To Comment
Obama Delayed James Foley Rescue a Month, Fretting over His Image and Golfing

"Pentagon sources said Foley and the others might well have been rescued but Obama, concerned about the ramifications of US troops being killed or captured in Syria, took too long to authorise the mission."

http://www.breitbart.com/InstaBlog/2014/08/24/Obama-Fretted-Over-His-Image-and-Golfed-While-Foley-Languished-for-a-Month
9 weeks ago
9 weeks ago Link To Comment
I wish this were a surprise. He was apparently afraid to try the rescue fearing he would be "Carterized" if it failed. So he waited a month. Whether that made any difference, I don't know.

But the story suggests Obama is so afraid of losing face that he'll lose his pants. And of course, Foley lost his head. There is a cost to not acting, not resisting, not facing up to things while there is still an opportunity to stop things. Timing in history is everything. Alas, for the president, the talking points mean more to him than they reasonably should.
9 weeks ago
9 weeks ago Link To Comment
Well there's a course five miles away, I checked:
http://www.norwoodhills.com/
Welcome to the Premier Golfing Destination in St. Louis, Missouri.
Home of the 1948 PGA Championship won by Ben Hogan.
9 weeks ago
9 weeks ago Link To Comment
"It’s funny until you realize the same mentality is protecting you from ISIS."

No, what is protecting me from ISIS, ISIL, IS or what ever it is calling itself today are two oceans and about 12,000 Km's. Terrorism does not threaten America. It threatens Amerivcans but that is not the same thing. You need to kill a lot o 'mericans to threaten America. 200 Million wouldn't be enough, since that would just leave room for more immigrants.
McDonalds , Wendy's, KFC and various other fast food joints kill more 'mericans then terrorists do. So why isn't the Air Force bombing McDonalds?
Or Starbucks (social engeering with vigor)
Because it is all about money.
Has anybody figured out yet what bombing ignorant 3rd world goat herders is going to accomplish?
If I had a button to push and make ISIS (......whatever) go away, I would. Tomorrow some new set of initials would spring forth and start killing Christains and beheading reporters. If killing them is your solution, you have 10,000 down and 1.6 billion to go. I don't think hand tools will get the job done.
"It puts the lotiuon on"
-Buffalo Bill
"Silence of the Lambs"
9 weeks ago
9 weeks ago Link To Comment
This being in my wheelhouse I should say something, but there's little to say yet it takes a while to say it.

Well, you have to remember that this represents a BILLION dollars spent, and since there is NO WAY to honestly spend even a tenth of that on such a project, it was obviously more of a boondoggle than it was a development project. I will bet that the dollars paid to the people who actually wrote code was on the order of 5% of the total spent (and most of them have never set foot in the US).

The only way you run such inefficiencies is with third-rate people. Mr. Simo seems quite competent, he raises some basic security "best practices" issues, but as he also says, you see these errors all over, and you certainly do. The very fact that he can see all these details is an additional security breach, yet Microsoft and others (little Microsoft software went into this, as I understand) encourage such inefficient and insecure design. That said, I was ready for him to say some much worse things. Maybe he censored himself.

So the problems are widely systemic, maybe the human and epic truths that Chesteron could have written poems about. Maybe not.
9 weeks ago
9 weeks ago Link To Comment
"The average tech wage on the mid-Peninsula (San Mateo County) last year was $291,497. Although that was down about 5 percent from 2012, it was still — by far — the highest average tech wage in the nation, surpassing Silicon Valley (Santa Clara County) by almost $100,000.

No one knows how much Zuckerberg contributed to aggregate wages in San Mateo County last year, but if you remove $3.3 billion from the total, you end up with an average tech wage of roughly $210,000. That’s still high, but more in line with Santa Clara County, where the average tech wage was about $196,000 last year.

This illustrates how outliers can distort averages. Schiada said the wage median (the midpoint in a sequence of numbers) would better reflect a typical worker’s income, but she did not have the data needed to construct a median."

http://blog.sfgate.com/pender/2014/08/21/these-tech-worker-wages-will-astound-you/
9 weeks ago
9 weeks ago Link To Comment
"It’s funny until you realize the same mentality is protecting you from ISIS."

And timely enough we hear this morning that they have identified the probable executioner of Foley, a London Rapper who is known to have left "merry old" to fight with ISIS.

It seems that said rapper was enraged that his father was extradited to the U.S., charged with having aided Osama Bin Laden in the US Embassy bombings of 1998. His father is a "Human Rights Lawyer."

Just think what Progressivism has wrought! Human rights lawyers and terrorist bombings, evolving to rappers and beheadings.
9 weeks ago
9 weeks ago Link To Comment
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cOZ5VcQIiFc

--in the headwaters of the headcutters: London, Hyde Park, 1969, the rock era's hugely anticipated supergroup Blind Faith, in its first and last concert, plays "Sea of Joy". Note the sea of joy.
9 weeks ago
9 weeks ago Link To Comment
I love the quote from the new "A Most Wanted Man", "A Human Rights Lawyer? You're a social worker for Terrorists."
9 weeks ago
9 weeks ago Link To Comment
Next up:
Rapping be-headers on MTV.
9 weeks ago
9 weeks ago Link To Comment
Well........ I'm watching the video and about 7 or 8 minutes in , the video disappears and a gray circle with an exclamation point in it appears in its place?????
9 weeks ago
9 weeks ago Link To Comment
I missed that! Sounds like fun!
9 weeks ago
9 weeks ago Link To Comment
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