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Iran and Syria are Getting Blown Up. And Sometimes Shot.

March 18th, 2012 - 1:04 pm

It’s all the rage.  Literally.  Two explosions at Iranian military/nuclear weapons sites.  Four explosions in Syria, including three suicide bombers in Damascus on Saturday, two of which were aimed at Syrian security forces buildings,  all in the past few days.  Today’s explosion was in Aleppo, and also “near a government security building.”

The Iranian blasts are seemingly more dramatic, and probably part of the ongoing campaign being waged against the installations of the Revolutionary Guards Corps, especially, but not solely, those connected to the nuclear weapons project.  One of the blasts took place at Zarin Dasht, once the site of a Russian mill, now an important component of the military/industrial complex of the country, where missile fuel and warheads for missiles are manufactured.  As is often the case, much of the complex is underground, which is where the explosion took place.  My sources tell me that seven people are missing and several are wounded and are being treated.  So far as I know there are no reports in the Iranian media.

The more dramatic event was the explosion at Natanz, generally credited as the major uranium enrichment center in the country.  The most important facilities are eight meters underground, and are among those potential military targets said to be very hard to destroy.  The explosion, according to my Iranian sources, took place in the next-to-bottom level of the underground structure, leading to a shutdown of the entire complex.

No public reports of this one, either, although Natanz generates electricity and a shutdown would be hard to cover up.   Nor has anyone taken “credit.”  Maybe the two explosions were just accidents, although it seems unlikely. Whatever the explanation, the Iranian and Syrian regimes certainly have their security issues, don’t they?  Slaughtering their people doesn’t seem to have induced an end to resistance.

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