Get PJ Media on your Apple

PJM Lifestyle

3 Ways to Use The Hunger Games: Catching Fire to Teach Your Kids About the Real World

Don't allow popular culture to destroy your family values. Use it to build them.

by
Rhonda Robinson

Bio

December 11, 2013 - 3:30 pm
Page 1 of 4  Next ->   View as Single Page
YouTube Preview Image

It was my daughter who first noticed it.

“You have a moral reason behind everything you do, Mom,” she said flatly.

To this day, I’m not sure if that was an accusation or a compliment. Considering she was in her early 20s at the time, it could have gone either way.

Until she made that statement, however, I never really thought of it like that. But she was right.

What she was referring to was not my piety or any virtue at all. It was the fact that I’m always on the hunt for “teachable” moments for my children. I’m the mom that turned a Disney vacation into a 10-day homeschool field trip.

It’s a good parent’s natural instinct to shield her child from harsh, cruel, and immoral influences. But it’s a wise parent that can discern the maturity level of a child and then expose these elements from the safety of observation.

Living in a culture steeped in evil and deception gives us plenty of opportunities to provoke conversations with our teenagers. Teaching kids to navigate popular culture by using it is an extremely powerful and influential tool for explaining destructive ideologies.

If you have impressionable teens, The Hunger Games: Catching Fire is a great place to start. Before we get into some examples, let’s clear something up first.

Catching Fire is not for young children. Nor is it another Twilight with an audience full of fantasizing adolescents.

There is an element of violence. While not particularly graphic by today’s standards, the reason for the cruelty is beyond the comprehension of the under-10 crowd. My advice here is to wait until the movie comes to DVD, watch it first, and then decide if your child can handle the issues presented.

If a child is old enough to read the books, it’s always best to start there.

Understanding the reason behind the violence takes the movie to another level. Which is exactly what makes this movie an excellent place to start.

Comments are closed.

All Comments   (9)
All Comments   (9)
Sort: Newest Oldest Top Rated
My reaction was to set up hay bales in the back yard with a target. My daughter and I practice archery with increasing success.
44 weeks ago
44 weeks ago Link To Comment
My daughter has also taken an interest in archery.
44 weeks ago
44 weeks ago Link To Comment
Bread and Circuses, and war. The ancient triad of distracting the masses. Free food and spectacle typically works well at distracting the masses from their miserable lot in life or even coming to accept it. It is particularly easy these days what with the generous welfare system to make them accept it.

War is used when the leaders make such a mess that even the welfare state can no longer be supported no matter what economic tricks the government tries. If they win, the people are happy and happier still if the soldiers bring back lots of loot. If they lose, very often the government gets overthrown, but not always for the better as the new regime is typically as bad or worse than the previous regime. (Of course not all wars are fought for this reason, but many have been. Even the Romans fought many wars to bring back loot and slaves to prop up the home economy.)
44 weeks ago
44 weeks ago Link To Comment
America has not fought wars "to bring back loot and slaves to prop up the home economy." Too often the US has fought wars that failed to benefit either our own country or those we stepped in to assist, such as in Viet Nam and arguably Iraq. (World War II, the Korean War and the Cold War were more successful in defeating or limiting tyranny.)

Freedom can only be won by people motivated to seek it for themselves. I haven't read the third book in the Hunger Games trilogy but I suspect that Katniss will become a leader who motivates and inspires the people of Panem to throw off their repressive government. Even the most inspiring leaders of our age, like Reagan, Churchill and Thatcher, have failed to reverse the trend of modern democracies toward grossly excessive regulation and spending. Other, less inspiring leaders, like our current President, have only accelerated the trend.
44 weeks ago
44 weeks ago Link To Comment
Agreed (although I should point out that the only reason Vietnam was a bust was because of the Democrat-controlled Congress, acting on Nixon's impeachment, refused to even supply the South Vietnamese with arms to appropriately defend themselves against the North Vietnamese, not to mention Walter Cronkite falsely reporting that the Tet Offensive was a disaster for us, not the Vietcong/NVA).

As far as the third book, I've done some digging into it. Let's put it this way: She does end up removing one repressive government, yet replaces it with yet another, even worse government before that one falls again in short order.
44 weeks ago
44 weeks ago Link To Comment
From an interview I read with the author, it looks like the third book reveals more about lies and deception in the media. The increasing inability to distinguish if what the media is presenting is truth or governmental propaganda.
44 weeks ago
44 weeks ago Link To Comment
I wouldn't mislead by saying she does the replacing, nor say the follow on tyranny just falls.

It ends on the I think appropriate note that the government has a hard time being better than the people on average.
44 weeks ago
44 weeks ago Link To Comment
Or perhaps, that government will not save you?
44 weeks ago
44 weeks ago Link To Comment
"such as in Viet Nam and arguably Iraq"


Please take note both wars were won, and it is only the lack of appropriate follow through by radical Democrats which brought about the apparent loss.
44 weeks ago
44 weeks ago Link To Comment
View All