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Will Roger Ebert Biopic Be a Big Bust?

Back in 1970, the unlikely friendship between a grizzled WWII vet and a shy young movie critic made (cult) movie history.

by
Kathy Shaidle

Bio

October 24, 2013 - 4:30 pm
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russ_meyer_ebert

Biopics range from the sublime (Coal Miner’s Daughter) to the shambolic (98.5% of the others).

Who hasn’t experienced that very particular sensation of profound embarrassment while watching, say, Wired or Beyond the Sea or pretty much any movie in which a real person is being impersonated by a badly cast actor, especially one burdened by distracting facial prosthetics?

Why do we get so exercised by “stunt casting” gone wrong, fuming for weeks over Alan Rickman’s performance as Ronald Reagan in The Butler?

Hell, I’m still mad at Alex Cox for making Gary Oldman wear a “hammer and sickle” t-shirt instead of a “swastika” one in Sid & Nancy, and his failure to cast Courtney Love as Oldman’s costar.

Maybe it has something to do with that part of our brain where the “uncanny valley” resides.

As well, we mistakenly believe we “know” famous people — even own them, in a way.

How dare an actor get “our” celebrity wrong! How dare that director cast the wrong person to play him?

The passionate comments beneath this article on Sacha Baron Cohen’s firing from the Freddie Mercury biopic are representative.

Whereas I have no investment in that project (emotional or otherwise), there are dueling Clash biopics in various stages of development, so here’s sensational news for both producers:

I’ve got your Mick Jones right here.

Happy to help!

Comments are closed.

All Comments   (22)
All Comments   (22)
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As long as they leave out the last 15 years of his life where he was an unbearable, pompous ass, it should be a drive-in favorite where the liberals can watch it whilst smoking some pot.
1 year ago
1 year ago Link To Comment
There are no statues of critics.
1 year ago
1 year ago Link To Comment
I'm sure this movie will be a critical masterpiece; every left wing extremist, tinkerbell and Hollywood elitist will SWEAR it's the best film ever made. They'll point to the handful of it's oscar nominations as proof.
Alas, the message will be lost on hundreds of millions of American like me who will not spend the $10-15 movie ticket price on a worthless piece of crap like this.
1 year ago
1 year ago Link To Comment
Counting down until Ebert's wife / widow elbows her way to the forefront, and attempts to take over the project. (She can be played by Michelle Obama in the movie ... which I will never, ever, watch.)
1 year ago
1 year ago Link To Comment
I hate to ask the obvious quesiton but do we really NEED a film biography of Roger Ebert? He didn't cure cancer, didn't fight gallantly in a war, didn't feed the hungry and didn't do anything that could be described as bettering the human condition. He was just one more film critic in a nation that is eyebrow deep in such persons. Maybe his relationship with Russ Meyer was sort of interesting but can it carry a two-hour film? As for casting the part - Who cares? There aren't too many chubby leading men in Hollywood. Maybe the chameleon-like Johnny Depp will put on a couple of pounds and get the part. And there's always Phillip Seymour Hoffman.
1 year ago
1 year ago Link To Comment
Will the biopic about Ebert be a winner or a bomb? Depends totally on who's been hired to write the screenplay. Shaidle doesn't even consider that factor. Maybe because she believes, along with the other 98%, that film is a visual medium and only the director counts. Sorry to introduce a little reality into the subject of film but it's all about the script. So if someone with brains, passion, talent and perseverance is hired on as writer, well then the film stands a chance of being first rate.
1 year ago
1 year ago Link To Comment
Er, Ricpic:

The "bust," er, line was simply a cutesy pun on Meyer's favorite type of female.

LIghten up.
1 year ago
1 year ago Link To Comment
True story - Some years ago a friend and I were watching a Russ Meyer flick on VCR. I can't remember which one and the fact that we were drinking heavily may have had something to do with it. One of us got the bright idea of actually calling Russ Meyer and telling him what a great guy we thought he was. (Did I mention that I was drunk?) We called the phone number on the VCR jacket for Meyer's production company in San Diego. To our amazement Russ himself answered. Turned out that he was running his operation out of his home at this time. We described ourselves as fans of his ourve and he was sort of gruff but ultimately couldn't have been nicer. (I think he had been drinking too.) He patiently answered questions from two drunken idiots for about fifteen minutes and told us were we could more easily purchase Russ Meyer products. Try doing that with Steven Spielberg.
1 year ago
1 year ago Link To Comment
best comment ever!
1 year ago
1 year ago Link To Comment
True. They don't make 'em like that anymore.
1 year ago
1 year ago Link To Comment
Desperate for material, Hollywood has hit the abyss when films about mediocre malcontents are considered worthy of bankrolling. Gene Siskel brought life to the duo. Ebert sulked. If Ebert hadn't suffered for a long period with facial cancer, scant few would have remembered him today.
1 year ago
1 year ago Link To Comment
Ebert was a knowledgable film critic who knew how to write, but he was a confirmed leftist, which strongly affected his take on movies. I followed him from when he was a columnist at the Daily Illini at the University of Illinois through his career as a film critic and TV personality. He and Siskel were a great team. They worked well together but often disagreed, which created a certain tension between them.

While Beyond the Valley of the Dolls may have been hip or camp back in the 1970s, its value can be judged by all the great screenwriting jobs Ebert got afterwards. I see no value in making a film about Ebert and Meyer collaborating on this movie - but it's often hard to understand Hollywood values and choices.
1 year ago
1 year ago Link To Comment
The only thing I find more tedious than celebrities are movies about them. Yes, I'm a cultural snob. I feel that one of most disastrous cultural events of the 20th century was the elevation of people so mundane that you probably wouldn't even want to have a drink with them into mega-celebrities. The more celebrated the vapid became, the less we saw of genuine talent. These day you watch a movie and it's hard to tell the characters apart because they all look so much alike. Are they chosen for their cookie-cutter appearance? This does make them archetypes and easier to process, I guess. Or do they all just go to the same plastic surgeon? Actors used to have individuality, quirkiness and actresses had glamour and mystery. Now that the actors are all so much alike the only thing that matters is the script and the special effects. Thank God for TCM!
1 year ago
1 year ago Link To Comment
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