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Although I’m not a fan, it’s not hard to see the truth behind Teddy Roosevelt’s warning about hyphenated Americanism.
The one absolutely certain way of bringing this nation to ruin, of preventing all possibility of its continuing to be a nation at all, would be to permit it to become a tangle of squabbling nationalities, an intricate knot of German-Americans, Irish-Americans, English- Americans, French-Americans, Scandinavian- Americans, or Italian-Americans, each preserving its separate nationality, each at heart feeling more sympathy with Europeans of that nationality than with the other citizens of the American Republic.
I would venture to say that many of us, if not most, could look over his list of hyphenated Americans and see our own family linage. However, as generations successfully assimilate, few continue to identify themselves as anything other than American.

No one is arguing that legitimate immigrants who come to America for its ideals and opportunities are unwelcome. However, the exhausting list of differences between the legal migration of the Roosevelt era and the illegal infiltration we are experiencing today makes his sentiments all the more relevant.

However, there are hyphens that bring division and there are hyphens that bind us together.

In spite of popular belief, America was founded on principles. All men are “created” equal. The God that created us in His image, the Judeo-Christian God, gave us what we call our American values. Is it any wonder those very values are under attack from evil on all sides?

In the closing chapter of Shmuley Boteach’s Kosher Jesusthe author suggests that a Jewish Jesus is the hyphen that binds the two faiths together. Two separate and distinct religions united by Jesus of Nazareth. These two faiths ever locked together are the genesis of American values.

Here’s how following Jesus can unite rather than divide us.