Get PJ Media on your Apple

PJM Lifestyle

Thirteen Weeks: Times Three

So it's the end of another 13 weeks, and the question is: pivot or persevere?

by
Charlie Martin

Bio

August 31, 2013 - 6:35 am
Page 1 of 2  Next ->   View as Single Page

egg_dismay

How time flies when you’re having fun.

I’d actually expected to be at WorldCon in San Antonio this weekend, neatly bracketing this thirteen week experiment — you may recall I was in San Antonio at a wedding on the first of June — but the universe apparently was having other plans. I was laid off my day job on Tuesday, and it really didn’t seem practical to go for various reasons, including having several companies wanting to talk to me on Thursday and Friday. (I haven’t got a new day job yet, so if any of my readers are looking for senior geeks, you can find me on LinkedIn.)

It wasn’t a terrific surprise, as I’d been fighting with the management above me for a good while; in fact, it was a bit of a relief. It’s an interesting coincidence that it comes in the last week of 13, though, because — as you probably deduced if you read my last couple of weeks’ columns — I’ve been unsatisfied with this experiment. So, now we’re at the end of the experiment, and the question is: pivot or persevere?

My answer? Both.

Changing the diet and cutting the metformin in June has improved the low end of my blood sugar; unfortunately, it has done so by moving the band up. I don’t have a new A1c value yet, but my morning fasting blood sugar has averaged 121, up a bit fron the last experiment.

The “slow carb with vacation days” diet has probably contributed to that; what’s more, for me, it was harder to maintain that diet than the low-carb diet. Something that undoubtedly contributed to that was that I stopped keeping a detailed meal diary.

I did discover a way of fitting exercise into life that continues to work pretty well — slipping Tabata intervals into my Pomodoro routine.

So, part one of the pivot: I’m changing the diet again. I continue to think that carbs along with whatever physiological differences go with metabolic syndrome to type-2 diabetes are a major contributor to weight gains and higher blood sugar. At the same time, the really low carb diet stopped working for me for weight loss, and was associated with the episodes of really low blood sugar.

Comments are closed.

All Comments   (17)
All Comments   (17)
Sort: Newest Oldest Top Rated
So sorry your day job went away, Charlie, and hope you'll quickly find something that challenges you but which appreciates your amazing talents and strengths. Can't have been fun going up against knaves and fools, which they had to have been not to pay you more heed. You richly deserve all the respect and good feeling that your "other" job's readers offer you!
1 year ago
1 year ago Link To Comment
DocCorwin,
Your emphasis on inflammation seems to me correct. It's hard to grasp it's activity probably because our easiest menta image of inflammation is from when we were children looking at an infected skin cut & how it went away.
1 year ago
1 year ago Link To Comment
(2012) "Implication of inflammatory signaling pathways in obesity-induced insulin resistance"
full free text = http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3539134/
1 year ago
1 year ago Link To Comment
The extra-cellular matrix around adipo-cytes alters with inflammation. In cell membrabe there are mechano-transduction receptors for integrins there that connect to inside cell actin cyto-skeleton.
And, aside from mechano-transduction affects on that cell's actin, drugs can also alter the way & to what degree actin polymerizes. Charlie's statin affect on signal molecule platform may, or may not, be limiting how flexible the adipo-cyte actin is able to be.
Actin inside dell lets cell flex proteins associated with the internal cyto-skeleton. The change (or type/lack of) alters those proteins 3D configuration leading to which binding sites are (or are not) exposed in real time of metabolic processes.
Obesity is complicated by adipo-cyte hyper-trophy bulking up. If new adidpo-cytes can't differentiate to take up "fat" into lipid into fresher&smaller adipo-cytes the body can't clear out "fat" readily (old adipo-cytes just load up more & hyper-trophy more).
The signal protein ERK is needed to to help adipo-cyte differentiation. (& thus way to improve cycle of processing "fat" lipid droplets). ERK needs to work with receptors on the cell membrane & thence, through involvement of actin, the cyto-skeleton. Another intriguing effect of the de-polarized cyto-skeleton is that AKT (internal mediator of insulin signaling, among other things) is less able to be triggered (phosphor-ylation)
Some factors (specific drug molecules & inflammation) reorganize the cell's internal cytoplasm actin. In various ways the actin changes that cell's shape (morphology) from actin losing some adhesion. It can even lead to changes of how actin forms up aroung that cell's nucleus.
The inflammatory environment in the obese is associated with a relatively more rigid extra-cellular matrix. This impinges how cyto-skeleton lets metabolic processes go on inside that cell. Add in subtle drug interactions & sometimes you see better weight loss - or possibly unintentionally stymie weight loss.
1 year ago
1 year ago Link To Comment
... and depression!? http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2011/10/06/can-inflammation-in-this-organ-be-at-the-root-of-your-depression.aspx

5000IU of D3 daily (which I started because of a low D level, not for depression) certainly correlated with a *major* reduction in depressive episodes.
1 year ago
1 year ago Link To Comment
The stuff on intenstinal flora seems to point to an inflammatory process too. See eg http://www.sciencemag.org/content/328/5975/228.abstract
1 year ago
1 year ago Link To Comment
Charlie,

Your prolonged disciplined diets show that, for you as Type 2 diabetic, there is only so much linear correlation of body weight to fasting blood sugar. To some degree your prescription drugs confound what a non-diabetic might expect to see from your dietary trials.

Metformin (biguanide) is considered useful by cell researchers as a cell power house's mitochondrial "poison" - because it so interferes with one of the specific staging areas of the several mitochondria Complexes (previously detailed how Metformin acts). It's physiological effects are results with distinct clinical merits. I am not trying to discredit the drug - just remarking it's side effect may include metabolic limitations.

Statin use implies some cholesterol will also be pulled from cell membrane caveolae. This makes the caveolae shallower & then that membrane has less proteins anchoring through into the internal cell cytoskeleton. With less signaling conglomerates in the caveolae (previously detailed how caveolae/caveolin acts) there is some receptor(s) loss & so that internal cell's effectors that might modify the cell activity are not prompted into action. I am not trying to discredit the drug - just repeating statins for some people impede weight control.

Lastly, please do not confuse non-diabetics on high fat/low carb diets ability to lose all the weight they want to. That diet for some is apparently practical to control blood sugar to a respectable degree. The is extensive research on high fat diets' impact on excess weight. You, as a medicated long term Type 2 diabetic, may have reached the practical limit of how much can linearly lose when core of diet's plan is based around high fat & simply tweaking amount of carbs (or daily calories). The coming glycemic control phase should be interesting!
1 year ago
1 year ago Link To Comment
Thanks. Yeah, that's all interesting. My lipids were so low I wonder if 13 weeks of no statins might not be worthwhile. And your point about the high fat low carb diet's a good one; I probably don't emphasize my belief that there are several populations with different issues well enough; that's probably worth a column in itself.
1 year ago
1 year ago Link To Comment
I'm considering dropping the Zocor, at least for a bit. I miss me some grapefruit. Bacon just doesn't quite make up for it. ;)
1 year ago
1 year ago Link To Comment
Sorry to hear about your job setback! Just wanted to let you hear from another reader who appreciates what you do and what you write. I'm struggling with Type 2 for the past year and a half and it's just a puzzle. Carbs are bad for me, but the glucose readings and weight loss do not follow a perfect correlation to what I eat. Plus there's a very bad morning reading no matter what I do. So part of educating and motivating myself is reading what you and others are writing; thank you for sharing your experiences, thoughts, and research as you deal with similar issues.
1 year ago
1 year ago Link To Comment
RD, that bad morning reading is called "dawn effect". I know I've written about it before, because I see it a lot too, but I can't find the link just instantly.Basically, what happens is that your liver responds to high insulin levels and low blood sugar by a process called gluconeogenesis, which is to say it makes new glucose out of glycogen. But since you're T2DM, the high insulin doesn't stimulate sugar uptake effectively, so your blood sugar goes up.

One thing you might try is being careful to eat something with protein just before bed time; in theory that will keep your blood sugar from dropping and so inhibit gluconeogenesis. I've got to say it doesn't seem to make a helluva lot of difference for me.
1 year ago
1 year ago Link To Comment
Never could mix low carb and high carb days - cravings for carbs would not go away. Low carb every day keeps the cravings away. Also, there always was a time that low carb=>weight gain came to a stop.
Sorry about day job loss - do not be shy about applying for unemployment and hoping you find something else soon.
1 year ago
1 year ago Link To Comment
So sorry to hear of your job situation, it's not an easy thing to go through whether you were happy or not. I hope and pray a much better opportunity will soon come to you.

I really like this new tone, less frustration and more "ok let's try this other thing". Bless you Charlie, enjoy being with the cats.
1 year ago
1 year ago Link To Comment
Sympathies on the layoff. We are going through the same thing in our family. It's the recovery, ya know.

Kudos for continuing to experiment and tweak your routines. I remember a trendy Japanese management concept from the 80's -- continual improvement -- kaizen. Sounds like you're doing personal kaizen. I always liked that idea.
1 year ago
1 year ago Link To Comment
It really is a lot like Kaizen. I must think on this more.
1 year ago
1 year ago Link To Comment
Charlie,
Back at work Office PN 269 756 3606 Patient HK. 65 yo WM. On Byetta 10 (once/day) cinnamon (of course) topomax 12.5 (I wanted 25) phenterminne (1/2 of37.5/day0 for two months.Weight loss fro 323 to 295.Contact me
Colin
By the way, I'm more and more certain an underlying inflammation is responsible for so much of the cardiometablic problems I'm trying Bystolic plus victoza-low dos of both and taking people off their Advair puffers. No coughing,increase in Pfts
1 year ago
1 year ago Link To Comment
Done, check your email.
1 year ago
1 year ago Link To Comment
View All