Get PJ Media on your Apple

Rule of Law

Eight Last Minute Book Gifts for Children

December 18th, 2012 - 10:33 am

It’s late in the holiday shopping season, and you are short on ideas for that child, nephew, niece or grandchild that loves to read.  As someone who has perused quite a number of books for kids, I can tell you that there are good ones and bad ones – and I don’t mean quality.  While some of the bad ones are obviously bad, sometimes it is not so obvious.  So here are eight PJ-approved gifts for kids, while there is still time to get them:

 1. The Keeping Quilt by Patricia Polacco.

This is probably the most beautiful children’s book I have ever read.  It is the story of Jewish immigrants to the United States.  It tells the story of an article of clothing owned by those immigrants being turned into a quilt that is passed down, one generation to the next.  It is a story of traditions, family, goodness, celebration and America.

 2. The Little House on the Prairie Series by Laura Ingalls Wilder.

These books are indispensable children’s literature and should be in every home.  They are the story of the Ingalls family through young Laura’s eyes as they travelled west and made America.  It is a story of self-reliance, hard work, faith, values and goodness.  The hardships suffered by this American family are a reminder of how this country was built.

 

3. The Little Island by Margaret Wise Brown.

Skip the silly Goodnight Moon by the same author and get this lyrical story of a small island, faith, nature, and the march of time.

4. Land of Pilgrims’ Pride by Callista Gingrich.

Ellis the Elephant tells the story of the original 13 colonies.  There are lots of “history” books about America for kids, many written by Lynne Cheney, but Land of Pilgrim’s pride is one of the latest.

5. The Man Who Walked Between the Towers by Mordacai Gerstein.

This is the true story of Philippe Petit’s staggering caper to walk between the towers of the World Trade Center on a tightrope.  It is a story of courage, daring, fearlessness and ultimately, sad memory.

Click here to view the 1 legacy comment

Comments are closed.