May 13, 2014

USA TODAY: College rape tribunals fail students.

A system run by university employees will always face the temptation to put the school’s interest above the interest of victims. . . .

As bad as schools are at providing justice for rape victims, they might be worse at protecting the rights of the accused.

Across the country, accused students don’t have the right to see all the evidence against them, and administrators can find a student guilty based on low levels of proof, rather than “clear and convincing evidence.” Protecting the accused is no small matter when 2% to 10% of rape accusations are found to be false and many more are riddled with uncertainty.

Until colleges and local government find a way to bring the full power of criminal courts to bear on sexual assault among students, campus courts will remain second-class justice for both rape victims and those who are accused.

It’s a kangaroo-court system that’s not adequate when the rape is real, and that’s way too heavy handed and unfair when it’s not.

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