November 14, 2012

YEAH, THEY ONLY ENFORCE THAT LAW AGAINST PEOPLE WHO RECORD STUFF LIKE BAD COPS, RUDE CIVIL SERVANTS, AND POLITICIANS SOLICITING BRIBES:

Mayor Rahm Emanuel, at a Monday news conference, didn’t like questions about whether his press office had recorded reporters’ conversations without first seeking their consent.

That’s a big no-no under the Illinois Eavesdropping Act, one of the toughest two-party consent laws in the country.

One woman, Annabel Melongo, spent 20 months in Cook County Jail before a judge finally freed her.

Her crime: She had recorded a couple of phone calls with a court clerk. We’re talking felony, folks.

Emanuel, invoking “Will” Shakespeare, dismissed such bothersome questions about his press office doing the same as “much ado about nothing.”

In Chicago, laws are for the little people. Kinda like the rest of America under the Chicago crowd.

UPDATE: Remember this? Chicago State’s Attorney Lets Bad Cops Slide, Prosecutes Citizens Who Record Them.

Meanwhile, will Cook County State’s Attorney Anita Alvarez, who prosecuted Tiawanda Moore for recording cops’ efforts to pressure her into dropping a sexual harassment complaint, go after Rahm Emanuel? Not too likely. Tiawanda Moore was one of the “little people.” Rahm is not.

I don’t think Emanuel can claim a due process right to record the police, either — since, you know, he was recording journalists.