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Ed Driscoll

The Closing of the Leftwing Mind

January 3rd, 2014 - 12:45 pm
time_magazine_cover_parody_11-21-13-1

The Time cover we’d all like to see.

Or, building a diverse readership, you’re doing it wrong, Time magazine.

This week, Time magazine columnist Hanna Rosin claims that “Men Are Obsolete”  (link safe; goes to Newsbusters). As Helen Smith asked in 2012, when Rosin published a book with the similar title of The End of Men, why does Rosin hate her son so? But when you add up the wide swatches of America that Time has declared obsolete in the last 50 years, perhaps the question should be expanded to: Outside of Manhattan, the Hamptons, Beverly Hills, and the Beltway, depending on who is currently ensconced in power there, what parts of America does Time magazine not hate?

It didn’t always seem like Time was at war with its readers; it had to acquire them first. In 1923, Henry Luce, the scion of Christian missionaries to China, invented the concept of the news magazine with the first issue of Time. The magazine’s name reflected its dual purpose; as Alan Brinkley wrote in The Publisher, his 2010 biography of Luce, his goal was to both record the march of time and save his readers plenty of it by providing them with a centralized weekly news source. Even before American officially entered World War II, Luce, a centrist Republican, used his magazine to champion the notion that the 20th century would be the American century, in much the way that the 19th century was England’s century of glory.

However, by the mid-1960s, between Luce aging and turning more and more of the day-to-day responsibilities of running his media empire over to others, and ultimately, his death in 1967, Time would reverse the positive pro-American direction that Luce had established, which led to his magazine’s initial triumphs. In 1966, the magazine famously asked, “Is God Dead?” While the editors attempted to soften Friedrich Nietzsche’s epoch-shattering aphorism of 1882 with a question mark, that they would ask the question in the first place lets you know what Luce’s successors believed. Three and a half years later, voting “The Middle Americans” as their man of the year for 1969, those same editors would look at the conservative suburban American subscriber base that Luce had built up through the decades and ask themselves…who are these people?

The American dream that they were living was no longer the dream as advertised. They feared that they were beginning to lose their grip on the country. Others seemed to be taking over—the liberals, the radicals, the defiant young, a communications industry that they often believed was lying to them. The Saturday Evening Post folded, but the older world of Norman Rockwell icons was long gone anyway. No one celebrated them: intellectuals dismissed their lore as banality. Pornography, dissent and drugs seemed to wash over them in waves, bearing some of their children away.

* * * * * * *

The gaps between Middle America and the vanguard of fashion are deep. The daughters of Middle America learn baton twirling, not Hermann Hesse. Middle Americans line up in the cold each Christmas season at Manhattan’s Radio City Music Hall; the Rockettes, not Oh! Calcutta! are their entertainment. While the rest of the nation’s youth has been watching Dustin Hoffman in Midnight Cowboy, Middle American teen-agers have been taking in John Wayne for the second or third time in The Green Berets. Middle Americans have been largely responsible for more than 10,000 Christmas cards sent to General Creighton Abrams in Saigon. They sing the national anthem at football games—and mean it.

The culture no longer seems to supply many heroes, but Middle Americans admire men like Neil Armstrong and to some extent, Spiro Agnew. California Governor Ronald Reagan and San Francisco State College President S.I. Hayakawa have won approval for their hard line on dissent. Before his death last year, Dwight Eisenhower was listed as the most admired man in the nation—and Middle America cast much of the vote. In death, John Kennedy is also a hero. Ironically, Robert Kennedy had the allegiance of much of Middle America along with his constituency of blacks and the young. Whatever their politics, both Kennedys had an idealism about America [So you say -- Ed], a pride about it to which Middle Americans responded because they shared it.

While Luce was a moderate Republican, and a believing Christian, his successors would be increasingly left-leaning establishment Democrats who worshipped at the altar of The State. In 1989, Time featured George Washington on its cover with a tear descending from his cheek, and the headline, “Is Government Dead?” As Steve Hayward perceptively noted at Power Line in 2012, comparing the ’89 “Is Government Dead? and the ’66 “Is God Dead?” stories, for the post-Luce incarnation of Time, Hayward “recognized that since government is, for liberals, the secular substitute for God, these were essentially the same story.”

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Top Rated Comments   
No, men are not obsolete; Hanna Rosin and her ilk are. When magazines columnists have to dredge up such obvious tripe, you know they have nothing left (pun intended) of significance to write about.

I do admit though that the 'left' has our number. Here we are on this well-intentioned site wasting time, thought, and effort on such absurdities as 'ending inequality' and 'Are men obsolete' instead of pressing full steam on items of real emergency such as immigration by fiat, the budget, a stock market that's soon to crash, etc.

And furthermore, ....Oh, look, SQUIRREL!
42 weeks ago
42 weeks ago Link To Comment
Gloria Steinem said that women need men like fish need a bicycle.

And Rosin posits whether men are "obsolete".

Angry, genocidal women with a "vagenda" have one little, tiny, curious vacancy in their argument. They almost NEVER aim it at Muslim, black or Hispanic men.

Culturally, one would think that "machismo" would set them off on a tirade. Instead, it seems...they are more in the nature of dog training Pajama Boy to sit, roll over and speak only on command.

Thus, the harsh words and snapping insults are not intended for those who are culturally very manly...but rather, the choke chain is wrapped around the neck of the neutered males. Or the intended to be neutered.

The Vagenda Monologues have an audience in mind...but real misogynists don't have a ticket to the play. Guilt tripping the castrati into behavior modified permanent puppyhood is now in its 40th year.

Men are not obsolete, but the family jewels of leftist men are.
42 weeks ago
42 weeks ago Link To Comment
I should also add that last we heard from Hanna Rosin, she was gaining infamy for writing "good riddance" upon the death of Berenstain Bears author/artist Jan Berenstain, presumably for being a gender-traitor and producing safe, beloved, gentle children's books "mired" (as Rosin would say) in the mores of mid-century America.

Yet another case of "we have no morals and we will attack you."

By all accounts Jan Berenstain was just the sort of woman the Left claims it celebrates. She was a real-life Rosie the Riveter during WWII -- she made her own wedding rings out of spare aircraft aluminum for Pete's sake. Yet, that wasn't enough for angry, hateful Leftists like Rosin.
42 weeks ago
42 weeks ago Link To Comment
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All Comments   (46)
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I have gotten Time magazine for 5 years.. They get thrown away a lot and I fish them out of the recycling Bin .. They go into the bottom of my Bird cage.. Its all its good for !
41 weeks ago
41 weeks ago Link To Comment
Any woman who would even dream up the idea of men being obsolete is just your typical leftwing female: a lesbian or a woman too ugly to succeed with men. Real women adore real men.
41 weeks ago
41 weeks ago Link To Comment
Time's cover story for September 16, 2013:


The World According to Vladimir Putin; Putin pictured (Europe, Middle east, Africa; Asia; South Pacific editions)
It's Time to Pay College Athletes; Johnny Manziel pictured, hamming it up (US edition)

Since then I've taken nothing seriously from Time and have concluded that it's time to boycott the ragazine into oblivion.
42 weeks ago
42 weeks ago Link To Comment
"Left wing mind"?

It has long been said of Time and its (now defunct) sister, the "photojournalism magazine" Life, that Life was for people who couldn't read and Time for those who couldn't think.
42 weeks ago
42 weeks ago Link To Comment
There is no such thing as "the left wing mind." Moderate conservatives now call themselves social democrats or left liberals, but they are capitalists with a "heart" unlike their enemies on "the Right." See http://clarespark.com/2012/07/19/communist-ideas-go-mainstream/, for the confusing merging of communism with social democracy after the 1960s.
42 weeks ago
42 weeks ago Link To Comment
It appears that those, of the left, are so confident they're the majority, they can alienate the rest of the country and still be successful. Meanwhile, newspapers lose circulation, the political TV shows are losing audience, Left-wing radio is a flop and might soon be off the air in many cities. Apparently being arrogant, and successful, is harder to do than people think.
42 weeks ago
42 weeks ago Link To Comment
They know they don't even have to be successful anymore. As long as the 'important' people in Boston, NYC, and DC approve, they'll just be held up by tax dollars given by the Feds to keep them afloat.
42 weeks ago
42 weeks ago Link To Comment
"Since the idea of a weekly newsmagazine is rendered anathema by the speed of the Internet, "

Not necessarily true. A well-edited magazine that cuts through the chaff, summarizes the news and offers context, even alternative points of view, I think would become a boon.

With so much news out there, a trusted site that knows the difference between fact and advocacy could do very well.

For example, even though we're not Canadian, my wife and I read MacLean's, the Canadian weekly, through our library. While it's not perfect -- it dropped Mark Steyn's column last year -- I find it far more readable and informative than Newsweek (to which we subscribed but let it lapse).
42 weeks ago
42 weeks ago Link To Comment
I get my news from The Root (owned by The Washington Post).
41 weeks ago
41 weeks ago Link To Comment
Isn't the term "left wing mind" an oxymoron?
42 weeks ago
42 weeks ago Link To Comment
The Sixties brought … an important
structural change in America

writes Paul Johnson in his monumental
"History of the American People."

http://no-pasaran.blogspot.com/2012/04/evidence-of-fraud-in-2008-election.html

America had always been, from the earliest time, a democratic society, in that men (and indeed women) paid little attention to formal rank, even where it existed. Every man felt he had the right to shake hands with every other man, even the President … But this democratic spirit was balanced by the tribute of respect to those who, for one reason or another — experience, learning, position, wealth, office, or personality — had earned the title of 'boss.' The balance struck between egalitarianism and deference was one of the most remarkable characteristics of America, and one of its great strengths.

The Sixties brought a change. In the space of a decade, the word 'boss' passed almost out of the language, certainly out of universal usage. Deference itself deferred to a new spirit of hostility to authority. It became the fashion to challenge long-established hierarchies, to revolt against them or to ignore them. Nowhere was this spirit more manifest than in the media …

The gradual but cumulatively almost complete transfer of opinion-forming power from the owners and commercial managers of TV stations to the program-makers and presenters was one of the great new facts of life, unheard of before the 1950s, axiomatic by the end of the 1960s. And it was gradually paralleled by a similar shift in the newspaper world, especially on the great dailies and magazines of the East Coast, where political power, with few exceptions, passed from proprietors and major stockholders to editors and writers. Owners like Hearst and McCormick (of the Chicago Tribune), Pulitzer and Henry Luce (of Time-Life), who had once decided the political line of their publications in considerable detail, moved out of the picture and their places were taken by the working journalists.

Since the latter tended to be overwhelmingly liberal in their views, this was not just a political but a cultural change of considerable importance. Indeed it is likely that nothing did more to cut America loose from its traditional moorings.

… The change could be seen in 1960, in the way the East Coast media (the New York Times and Washington Post, Time and Newsweek), handled the contest between Nixon and Kennedy.


(From the NP post
"Evidence of Fraud in 2008 Election? A Surprising
Number of Parallels with JFK's 1960 Campaign" —
Be sure to check out the very first
Paul Johnson quote in that post…)
42 weeks ago
42 weeks ago Link To Comment
"invented the concept of the news magazine with the first issue of Time."

Oh, really? I'm sure James Wilson would be surprised to know this. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Economist_magazine
42 weeks ago
42 weeks ago Link To Comment
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