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Dr. Helen

Out: House-flipping, In: Dog-flipping?

November 10th, 2013 - 5:40 am

I was recently looking at the news site of our local station and saw a story on how pets are being stolen and “flipped” for cash:

(KSDK) Criminals are finding a new way to make money on other people’s pets. They’re flipping pets, and it’s happening across the country.

Flipping is stealing a pet and reselling it on places like Craigslist, Facebook, Ebay and other websites. Victims across the country said they tried to file police reports to report their pets stolen but many couldn’t. Law enforcement agencies wouldn’t take the report.

In Indianapolis, a full-time officer is hunting down the flippers and charging them.

Officer Theresa Redmon was able to get an older dog named Stewart back to his owners. He disappeared on his mother’s wedding night from his home.

“I hit the street, I was out looking for him,” said Jenelle Carr. She and her 5-year-old daughter and 9-year-old son and husband spent nine heartbreaking days looking for him. “I couldn’t sleep. He’s a Chihuahua. He’s deformed, he has no nails, no teeth.”

Carr knew somebody snatched Stewart. She switched from searching the streets to surfing the web. She landed on a website called Indy Lost Pet Alert.

My question is “how do you make money off a deformed Chihuahua with no nails or teeth? Are they that much in demand?

An officer in the article says the following:

“If you found my kid, my child, my daughter, would you put her on Craigslist tomorrow? It’s the same thing” she said. “Pets are a part of their owner’s family.”

Really? Yes, pets are important but are they as important as a person? So many people are substituting “fur children” for kids that maybe it really is getting to be the same thing. Don’t get me wrong. It’s terrible that anyone should be stealing pets and the police should take a report and find them, but to equate a dog with one’s child seems a bit overboard to me. But maybe I’m wrong on this one, given all the books and TV shows on pets. America is obviously obsessed with them.

What do you think?

Comments are closed.

Top Rated Comments   
I have a little dog (and I'm not fond of little dogs) that I found some time ago. The vet said she should weigh 11-12 lbs. She weighed 7.8 lbs. She's a mixed breed (maybe Yorkie-Maltese) but she has decided that I am the benevolent deity of her universe, and she has no qualms about going after bigger dogs, cows or horses that she thinks are getting to close. She has repaid the hassle of rescuing her a thousand-fold; she makes me laugh, she amazes me and humbles me. The fact that she will charge a horse that outweighs her 100-1 because she thinks it presents a threat to me will almost bring me to tears.

Try to hurt my dog and I will kill you. It's the least I can do in return.
40 weeks ago
40 weeks ago Link To Comment
I beg to differ with the other folks commenting here. My dog IS like my child, and I would be utterly distraught if someone kidnapped him. He goes with me everywhere constantly off leash, all day, we are never far apart. For those of us -- single, childless, lucky enough to have a great, special dog -- the emotional connection that dog gives is special to say the least ...
40 weeks ago
40 weeks ago Link To Comment
Pets are property. The "fur children" people seem somewhat benignly mentally ill, transferring their maternal instincts onto an animal. It becomes malign when they think the pet and a human child are the really the same thing. The pets are attractive to thieves because they go for good money; $800-$2000 in some markets and are largely untraceable.
40 weeks ago
40 weeks ago Link To Comment
All Comments   (43)
All Comments   (43)
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Especially given the behavior of many of today's children, and the risks to men who have any interaction at all with the little rugrats, I long ago realized that given a choice between helping a child or helping a pet, the pet wins hands down. Dogs and cats don't make false accusations that you tried to molest them.

Then, too, given my experiences (and the reported experiences of many other men on the Internet and in person) with women, I greatly prefer the company of pets to women. Never has a dog or cat told me I was ugly or didn't have "enough" money or didn't have a flashy enough car or bling. Never has a dog or cat spent some guy's money with wild abandon. My debit and credit cards are safe around my cats.

Pets are superior to most people. More and more people seem to agree these days.
40 weeks ago
40 weeks ago Link To Comment
Plus your pet loves you, no matter what. And this unconditional love is very moving and comforting.
36 weeks ago
36 weeks ago Link To Comment
I think you should read A Boy and His Dog, by Harlan Ellison. It was made into a movie starring a young Jan Michael Vincent. Ellison also wrote the episode of Star Trek when Spock and McCoy jump through the time tunnel to rescue Kirk before he falls in love with and saves a woman from certain death, because if she had lived it would have changed the future.

Ellison is an interesting writer, always intriguing. A Boy and His Dog is set in the future, a post-apocalypse world. Humans are divided into two tribes, the above ground and the under ground dwellers.

On the surface, it's a constant fight for survival. Men have developed a telepathic link with their dogs, so they can communicate with each other mentally. It's a symbiotic relationship between them. The man finds food for his dog, and the dog finds women for him.

Beneath the surface, it is a sanitized, peaceful environment, where everyone lives (supposedly) in harmony. Problem is that all the men are sterile, and the population cannot reproduce. So what they do is send girls to the surface to lure virile men underground.

This is what happens in the story. A girl goes up to the surface and seduces a boy. She takes him down beneath the surface, where they plan on subjugating him and draining his sperm for artificial insemination. Once the boy figures out what they're planning to do, he revolts and escapes, taking the girl with him back to the surface. There, at the entrance, is his loyal dog waiting for him, almost dead from starvation.

The boy knows he cannot survive on the surface without his dog. So he kills the girl and feed her to him.

Now that's a story. And it all makes perfect sense. If you were that boy and you had a choice to make between a loyal dog, without whom you cannot survive, and a deceptive girl, who only wants to exploit you for your semen, which would you choose? I'd choose the dog every day, and twice on Sundays.

The relationship between a boy and his dog is not the same as the relationship between a boy and his girlfriend, or a husband and his wife, or a father and his children. It's just not. The bond between a boy and his dog is unique and inexplicable.

I've had a dog that could read my mind. I've never had a girlfriend that could. She's far too concerned with her own agenda.

Given the choice between a dog and a wife, these days, most men would rightly choose the former. A dog is loyal. A woman is fickle.
40 weeks ago
40 weeks ago Link To Comment
A young Don Johnson was in A Boy and His Dog. You might be thinking of Damnation Alley, another postapocalyptic movie that did star Vincent, along with the late George Peppard. Otherwise your description of the book and movie is right on target.

In Damnation Alley, Peppard is trying to find a TV acting job after making the error of leaving the highly rated series Banacek. (Joke.)
40 weeks ago
40 weeks ago Link To Comment
who cares what laws came first and the world in the 70s was not something mist of us had any part of when it came to laws since we were kids or not born yet. Dwell on the fact that laws are not stopping it from happening to animals kids and even adults. My way of looking at this is never has one single animal abused a human
40 weeks ago
40 weeks ago Link To Comment
Our children are middle-aged now, and their children are young adults and teenagers, so yes, we "baby" the little mixed-breed dog we got from a rescue organization. I know she's not the same as a human, but she IS part of our family, as all our dogs have been, and living with her satisfies an important emotional need for companionship and unconditional love.
40 weeks ago
40 weeks ago Link To Comment
Our family is one of those that has a fur kid. After 17 years of marriage we are clearly not ever going to have children. But a pretty common experience of young marrieds is to have dogs or cats and treat them like children as practice. This is what our early married years were like. As a single guy I would never have picked a Pomeranian for my dog. But the missus already had this little lap dog when we started dating.

Although in daily life I now act as if the Pomeranian Princess is my little girl. Her devotion, affection, dependency have made the lap dog the apple of my eye. In routine daily life I can treat her like a child...but after seeing the disaster of Hurricane Katrina and people stranded within their flooded homes I do know the difference between a child and my pet.

Katrina homeowners had to choose between kids and cats & dogs. I would be very sad but could leave behind my Pomeranian in my attic with a bag of food if it meant my wife and even the kids from next door could be rescued.

But as long as life isn't as desperate as Katrina I choose to act as if my dog is my heart.
40 weeks ago
40 weeks ago Link To Comment
Oregon, being a blue state, is not known for common sense. But one thing the legislature has done right; several years ago they created the crime of Theft of a Companion Animal and they made it a Felony.

It is not widely known and has come as a nasty shock to people who thought it would be neat to liberate Cockers and Chihuahuas from their little old lady owners.

I know of several police officers who put a lot of effort into locating stolen pets.
40 weeks ago
40 weeks ago Link To Comment
There was an old Dragnet episode where the criminal would steal a dog, then wait for the owners to post a reward for the return, and return it to them for the reward.
40 weeks ago
40 weeks ago Link To Comment
If my house was on fire I would rescue my child before my pet. That tells me all I need to know.

Those who have no human children and yet refer to their pets as their children are kind of pathetic. Pets are pets, children are children.

40 weeks ago
40 weeks ago Link To Comment
I have a little dog (and I'm not fond of little dogs) that I found some time ago. The vet said she should weigh 11-12 lbs. She weighed 7.8 lbs. She's a mixed breed (maybe Yorkie-Maltese) but she has decided that I am the benevolent deity of her universe, and she has no qualms about going after bigger dogs, cows or horses that she thinks are getting to close. She has repaid the hassle of rescuing her a thousand-fold; she makes me laugh, she amazes me and humbles me. The fact that she will charge a horse that outweighs her 100-1 because she thinks it presents a threat to me will almost bring me to tears.

Try to hurt my dog and I will kill you. It's the least I can do in return.
40 weeks ago
40 weeks ago Link To Comment
"It’s terrible that anyone should be stealing pets and the police should take a report and find them, but to equate a dog with one’s child seems a bit overboard to me."

Me, too. In fact, I find it disturbing that people consider them part of their families. So when push comes to shove, they'll choose the dog over another human being? Disturbing.

I'm not against well-behaved pets under the control of their owners. In fact, a neighbor of mine had a female Golden Retriever, and you know what they're like. :) That dog was one of the nicest living beings I've ever met, nicer than a lot of humans I can think of. But not all dogs are like that, and not all owners are responsible.
40 weeks ago
40 weeks ago Link To Comment
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