Tuesday evening, the AP published a story in which Texas Democrat governor candidate Wendy Davis attempted to change the subject from her discrepancies in her origins story. CNN, by the way, has joined those in media who regard Davis’ untruths as significant.

Back to Davis. In an attempt to move off her bio, the bio which up to now has been a centerpiece of her campaign, she has begun lashing out at the Abbott campaign while her online allies are attacking the political reporter, Wayne Slater of the Dallas Morning News, who wrote the article questioning her background. Neither is likely to have any positive effect for her campaign. Davis told AP in Tuesday’s interview that as governor she would support an expansion of concealed carry rights in Texas.

While Democrats elsewhere have called for tighter gun laws, Davis said she owns a handgun for protection, plans to obtain a concealed handgun license and supports legislation that allows workers to keep guns in their vehicles at work.

It’s a good idea. It’s one that’s likely to garner broad support in the legislature. In fact, it already did.

The 82nd session of the Texas legislature took up Senate Bill 321 beginning in January 2011. That Republican-sponsored bill codifies “an employee’s transportation and storage of certain firearms or ammunition while on certain property owned or controlled by the employee’s employer.” After going through the usual sausage-making that goes on in Austin, it passed, was sent to Gov. Rick Perry, and he signed it on June 17, 2011. It went into effect September 1 of that year and has been the law ever since.

State Sen. Wendy Davis voted for the bill, joining a solid bipartisan majority. It’s hard to see why she is touting this as a new idea now, unless she is proposing some expansion that she has yet to detail for the 84th session next year. That’s possible, as it’s exactly how she has approached her education policy.

h/t Larry Arnold