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The PJ Tatler

by
Myra Adams

Bio

August 26, 2013 - 2:22 pm

obama flag large

 

While thousands gathered at the Lincoln Memorial this past weekend to commemorate the 50th anniversary of Rev. Martin Luther King Jr.’s 1963 Civil Rights March on Washington, an American flag was waved with President Obama’s image in place of the 50 stars.

Photos of the “Obama flag” were included in the galleries of numerous prominent web sites such as Politico and USA Today.

But was the Obama flag just another news photo of the event?

Here was the caption from USA Today’s photo gallery:

A woman holds a flag depicting US President Barack Obama at the March on Washington rally at the Lincoln Memorial in Washington DC.

That’s all folks, just a woman holding our nation’s flag depicting our current president. Let’s move on to the next photo…

If this were the Daily Show I would be looking at you with that mouth-wide-open stunned daze that Jon Stewart has mastered.

Instead, I will scream in large letters; WHERE IS THE OUTRAGE?  And now imagine me ripping my hair out because not only was Obama’s face replacing the 50 stars truly despicable, but worse, was the fact that the mainstream media glossed over this image like it was just another event photo.

However, it was a different story on Twitter and in the “right-wing blogosphere.”

Here was an overview of comments culled from various sites and tweets representing that side of the political spectrum.

“The creepy cult of personality that surrounds President Obama is alive and well.”

“These marchers have no idea how offensive (on so many levels) this flag is.”

“Reminiscent of Sadaam Hussein, Stalin, Lenin, Hitler, Mussolini…..”

“Desecration….”

“Creepy reminder of totalitarians past.”

“The image makes me nauseous.  And I mean sick to my stomach.”

“Shades of Hitler.”

“American nightmare!  It’s against everything America stands for.”

“I guess the left doesn’t understand how offensive this is to someone who has served under the American flag.”

“State worship, meet hero worship.”

NOW can you feel the outrage?

What I found most troubling was that this flag was waved in front of the memorial of the president who waged a brutal Civil War to keep the Union together and now Obama’s image takes precedence over ALL the states of the Union that Lincoln fought so hard to preserve.

Today our flag is still sacrosanct to most Americans who love this nation. It especially calls to mind those who have fought and died to keep it flying, and those currently in harm’s way.

Nowhere in Washington is the love of flag and country more pronounced than at the Iwo Jima Memorial. The statue is based on a 1945 photo when Marines raised the flag during that horrific Pacific island battle in World War II.

This iconic memorial is less than a mile from where thousands gathered this past weekend for the 50th anniversary of Dr. King’s “I Have a Dream” speech.

But the flag flying at the Iwo Jima Memorial and the “ObamaNation” flag are separated by a steep decline in national respect. The Iwo Jima flag is the symbol of  national pride, the values we hold dear, and a reminder that freedom is not free. That flag will outlast any one president but the “ObamaNation” flag, as one commenter penned, amounts to ”Desecration.”

Yes, that word sums up my feelings and those of many others. But why not every American?

Shouldn’t  President Obama’s image on our flag be considered extremely distasteful regardless of personal political persuasion?  But not just because it is Obama’s face — the face of ANY president in our entire history replacing the 50 stars should elicit the same negative response.

So now it’s time to circle back to my original question, “Where is the outrage?”

Why isn’t the image of Obama’s face on our flag at the March on Washington striking an emotional chord in the mainstream media?

That question needs to be asked… and answered.

Furthermore, President Obama should ask his followers to destroy this demeaning “flag” that smacks of  idolatry, insults our military, desecrates our real flag, and is clearly un-American.

 

 

Myra Adams is a media producer, writer, and political observer who served on the McCain Ad Council during the 2008 McCain campaign, and on the 2004 Bush campaign creative team. Her columns have appeared on PJ Media, The Daily Caller, RedState and The Daily Beast. Myra's web site TheJesusStore.com contributes all profits to Christian charity. Follow Myra on Twitter @MyraKAdams

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Top Rated Comments   
Flag desecration for sure. Even if it was Ronald Reagan's image, it would still be desecration of the American flag. Even if it was George Washington's image.
33 weeks ago
33 weeks ago Link To Comment
I will need someone to bail me out of jail if I ever actually see one of these despicable displays personally....I will rip down and destroy this disgusting affront to the flag millions of us have fought, bled, and died for...so help me God. Anyone who attempts to stop me had better be prepared to deal with 190lbs of pissed off Army Ranger. This just makes my blood boil.

Remember BENGHAZI!
33 weeks ago
33 weeks ago Link To Comment
So if you burn this flag is it a racist hate crime or a beautiful expression of free speech?
33 weeks ago
33 weeks ago Link To Comment
All Comments   (24)
All Comments   (24)
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32 weeks ago
32 weeks ago Link To Comment
Les États, ils sont moi...
33 weeks ago
33 weeks ago Link To Comment
You actually expect the MSM (aka Ministry of Propaganda) to be outraged? If they had their way they would choose to make this the actual USA flag. The same holds true for most of the people at that event.
33 weeks ago
33 weeks ago Link To Comment
Meh. If someone -- what's the correct term this year? say -- "developmentally disabled" were to ruin a US flag, there wouldn't be much of an outrage because (1) it'd be questionable if the person's motivations were accountable, and (2) most folks take it for granted that the left is developmentally disabled. QED.
33 weeks ago
33 weeks ago Link To Comment
In any decent country there are laws about defacing/desecrating the national flag. I know the SCOTUS says it is free speech but they are the same that said that slaves are not persons and unborn Americans can be killed.

I look at the floor and I see it needs sweeping
While my guitar gently weeps
33 weeks ago
33 weeks ago Link To Comment
Why should there be outrage? The Obama flag was made by a private individual expressing his views.

Yeah, he's an idiot, but so what? The first amendment protects idiots, too. It's flag desecration, sure, but I sure won't put anybody in jail for that.

The whole point of the American flag is that America is a country where desecrating or even burning it is legal.

And yes, you have the free speech right to burn the Obamanation flag in public, too - so long as you burn your own and not create a fire hazard.
33 weeks ago
33 weeks ago Link To Comment
" It is better to keep ones mouth shut and appear to be unintelligent then to open ones mouth and prove it" as this maroon and cult following obamanites but yes your correct we have rights in the USA, in Syria they would of gassed the entire crowd
33 weeks ago
33 weeks ago Link To Comment
They should print that in a two ply roll.
33 weeks ago
33 weeks ago Link To Comment
Make mine without the stripes, please.
33 weeks ago
33 weeks ago Link To Comment
Free speech.
33 weeks ago
33 weeks ago Link To Comment
To burn the Obama flag.
33 weeks ago
33 weeks ago Link To Comment
Flag desecration for sure. Even if it was Ronald Reagan's image, it would still be desecration of the American flag. Even if it was George Washington's image.
33 weeks ago
33 weeks ago Link To Comment
" The fight for Iwo Jima in 1945 was one of the bloodiest of World War II. A tiny island in the Pacific dominated by a volcanic mountain and pockmarked with caves, Iwo Jima was the setting for a five-week, non-stop battle between 70,000 American Marines and an unknown number of deeply entrenched Japanese defenders. The courage and gallantry of the American forces, climaxed by the dramatic raising of the American flag over Mt. Suribachi, is memorialized in the Marine Corps monument in Washington, DC. Less remembered, however, is that the battle occasioned an eloquent eulogy by a Marine Corps rabbi that has become an American classic.

Rabbi Roland B. Gittelsohn (1910-1995), assigned to the Fifth Marine Division, was the first Jewish chaplain the Marine Corps ever appointed. The American invading force at Iwo Jima included approximately 1,500 Jewish Marines. Rabbi Gittelsohn was in the thick of the fray, ministering to Marines of all faiths in the combat zone. He shared the fear, horror and despair of the fighting men, each of whom knew that each day might be his last. Roland Gittelsohn’s tireless efforts to comfort the wounded and encourage the fearful won him three service ribbons.

When the fighting was over, Division Chaplain Warren Cuthriell, a Protestant minister, asked Rabbi Gittelsohn to deliver the memorial sermon at a combined religious service dedicating the Marine Cemetery. Cuthriell wanted all the fallen Marines – black and white, Protestant, Catholic and Jewish – honored in a single, nondenominational ceremony. Unfortunately, racial and religious prejudice was strong in the Marine Corps, as it was then throughout America. According to Rabbi Gittelsohn, the majority of Christian chaplains objected to having a rabbi preach over predominantly Christian graves. The Catholic chaplains, in keeping with church doctrine, opposed any form of joint religious service.

To his credit, Cuthriell refused to alter his plans. Gittelsohn, on the other hand, wanted to save his friend Cuthriell further embarrassment and so decided it was best not to deliver his sermon. Instead, three separate religious services were held. At the Jewish service, to a congregation of 70 or so who attended, Rabbi Gittelsohn delivered the powerful eulogy he originally wrote for the combined service:

Here lie men who loved America because their ancestors generations ago helped in her founding, and other men who loved her with equal passion because they themselves or their own fathers escaped from oppression to her blessed shores. Here lie officers and men, Negroes and whites, rich men and poor . . . together. Here are Protestants, Catholics and Jews together. Here no man prefers another because of his faith or despises him because of his color. Here there are no quotas of how many from each group are admitted or allowed. Among these men, there is no discrimination. No prejudices. No hatred. Theirs is the highest and purest democracy …

Whosoever of us lifts his hand in hate against a brother, or who thinks himself superior to those who happen to be in the minority, makes of this ceremony and the bloody sacrifice it commemorates, an empty, hollow mockery. To this, then, as our solemn duty, sacred duty do we the living now dedicate ourselves: to the right of Protestants, Catholics, and Jews, of white men and Negroes alike, to enjoy the democracy for which all of them have here paid the price …

We here solemnly swear that this shall not be in vain. Out of this and from the suffering and sorrow of those who mourn this will come, we promise, the birth of a new freedom for the sons of men everywhere.

Among Gittelsohn’s listeners were three Protestant chaplains so incensed by the prejudice voiced by their colleagues that they boycotted their own service to attend Gittelsohn’s. One of them borrowed the manuscript and, unknown to Gittelsohn, circulated several thousand copies to his regiment. Some Marines enclosed the copies in letters to their families. An avalanche of coverage resulted. Time magazine published excerpts, which wire services spread even further. The entire sermon was inserted into the Congressional Record, the Army released the eulogy for short-wave broadcast to American troops throughout the world and radio commentator Robert St. John read it on his program and on many succeeding Memorial Days.

In 1995, in his last major public appearance before his death, Gittelsohn re-read a portion of the eulogy at the fiftieth commemoration ceremony at the Iwo Jima statue in Washington, D.C. In his autobiography, Gittelsohn reflected, "I have often wondered whether anyone would ever have heard of my Iwo Jima sermon had it not been for the bigoted attempt to ban it."

The American Jewish Historical Society
33 weeks ago
33 weeks ago Link To Comment
so sad that the pilot of the Enola Gay had his grave hidden as he feared it would be desecrated - like the memorial for Audi Murphy - Liberal left wing nuts have no idea how good they have it- had the Greatest generation seen the future in a Time machine they may have backed off and lost
33 weeks ago
33 weeks ago Link To Comment
Chapeau!
33 weeks ago
33 weeks ago Link To Comment
Wow! Thank you so very much for that comment.
33 weeks ago
33 weeks ago Link To Comment
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