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Bryan Preston

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March 22, 2013 - 12:53 pm

The Washington Times reports that a quiz given to 5th graders at a Flour Bluff school included the following question:

“Why might the United States be a target for terrorism?”

The possible multiple choice answers on the quiz are:

A: Other people just don’t like Americans
B: Decisions we made in the United States have had negative effects on people elsewhere.
C: Terrorists hate everyone
D: None of the above

Answer B was graded as the correct answer. Parents are not happy.

One student’s mother, Kara Sands, is outraged, telling local TV station KRISTV that “I’m not going to justify radical terrorists by saying we did anything to deserve that; over 3,000 people died.”

Her son was also marked wrong on a worksheet covering the Bill of Rights, because he refused to classify food and medicine as Constitutional rights.

Nothing about this story has appeared so far on the Flour Bluff ISD’s Facebook page. It includes a number of items about sports (Home of the Hornets!), and even posts about a former student who appeared on American Idol, but nothing about the falsehood it’s teaching 5th grade kids about the 9-11 terrorist attacks, an event that happened before most of these fifth graders were born, or about the actual rights described in the Constitution. Food and medicine are not among them.

Parents are reportedly taking the issue up at the next school board meeting. Setting the politics aside, the teacher is teaching things to students that are factually wrong, and should be fired on the spot.

Bryan Preston has been a leading conservative blogger and opinionator since founding his first blog in 2001. Bryan is a military veteran, worked for NASA, was a founding blogger and producer at Hot Air, was producer of the Laura Ingraham Show and, most recently before joining PJM, was Communications Director of the Republican Party of Texas.

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Top Rated Comments   
I cannot help but wonder how many dozens of other examples are out there just like this one. Children are well served to have parents who monitor very closely the things their children are being taught in the public schools.
1 year ago
1 year ago Link To Comment
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All Comments   (7)
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It seems to me [not a parent] that some these [loaded] questions are requiring interpretations beyond the possible understanding of a ten year old child.

Isn't this part of the national problem we have now in permitting eighteen year old voters to participate in National elections? Being able to drive a car safely requires nowhere near the same mature emotional level as that required by those making decisions on who to vote into National Office.

This inherent electorate immaturity has yielded us Obama.
1 year ago
1 year ago Link To Comment
The test is apparently related to a reading assignment. It also appears to be "canned" perhaps even an "educational" DVD or online module. Hopefully the source material is being scrutinized as well as the test. Whoever selected the text or program needs to bear accountability. There are usually multiple decision-makers involved in signing off on the purchase of learning materials. The teacher is still responsible for what's delivered to the class, however the way it's packaged may have removed that decision from his or her hands. For example, was the module done in the computer lab, under supervision of someone other than the teacher? Those questions need to be asked by the parents.
1 year ago
1 year ago Link To Comment
E. Wahhabi Saudis are unflinching morons.
1 year ago
1 year ago Link To Comment
I cannot help but wonder how many dozens of other examples are out there just like this one. Children are well served to have parents who monitor very closely the things their children are being taught in the public schools.
1 year ago
1 year ago Link To Comment
B is in fact the most correct answer.

If the U,S, does something that has negative effects for some people, those people may retaliate by terrorism.

That does not mean that what the U.S. did is wrong.

Indeed, doing what is right is quite likely to produce a terrorist reaction from those whose interests are opposed to good. The U.S. is heavily exposed on this score, because we are so big that most things we do have big effects on lots of people,

B is not the only right answer, because there is also the possibility that people may believe wrongly that American decisions have been bad for them. They may blame things on the U.S. that we did not cause, or imagine that the U.S. did things that didn't actually happen, or misunderstand events as being bad for them. (All three apply with Moslems.)

Answers A and C are clearly wrong. Unmotivated dislike of the U.S. is not much of a motive for terrorism. As for C, terrorists generally hate one particular target. PKK doesn't set off bombs in Bolivia; the Tamil Tigers didn't attack Germany; ETA didn't assassinate any Swiss officials.
1 year ago
1 year ago Link To Comment
I think the question makes it sound like government decisions are the only things that affect people's idea of America. For radical muslims, our culture is probably more hated. After all, a church dance fueled Qutb's hatred.
1 year ago
1 year ago Link To Comment
The correct answer is D NONE OF THE ABOVE. 9/11 happened because the Koran teaches muslims to kill anyone that won't submit to islam either by becoming muslim or living under islam as a Dhimmi (or second class citizen).

The rest is just word games.
1 year ago
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