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Outpost in the East

April 18th, 2014 - 5:11 pm

A Washington Post report that the US has decided to deploy ground forces to Poland, ostensibly to act as a tripwire to deter further Russian threats, raises some interesting issues.

Poland and the United States will announce next week the deployment of U.S. ground forces to Poland as part of an expansion of NATO presence in Central and Eastern Europe in response to events in Ukraine. That was the word from Poland’s defense minister, Tomasz Siemoniak, who visited The Post Friday after meeting with Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel at the Pentagon on Thursday.

Siemoniak said the decision has been made on a political level and that military planners are working out details. There will also be intensified cooperation in air defense, special forces, cyberdefense and other areas. Poland will play a leading regional role, “under U.S. patronage,” he said.

The first is why the story was leaked from a Polish source in an administration that almost always rushes to announce moves it wants to depict as decisive. It is almost as if Warsaw wanted to pre-empt Obama before he could have second thoughts.

The second issue is that Poland will be taking the lead “under US patronage”. Obama, as usual, will be leading from behind.  The Washington Post story quotes the Poles as confessing that “US patronage” will be a hollow unless America re-arms. Here is how the WaPo put it:

But the defense minister also said that any immediate NATO response to Russian aggression in Ukraine, while important, matter less than a long-term shift in the defense postures of Europe and America. The United States, having announced a “pivot” to Asia, needs to “re-pivot” to Europe, he said, and European countries that have cut back on defense spending need to reverse the trends.

“The idea until recently was that there were no more threats in Europe and no need for a U.S. presence in Europe any more,” Siemoniak said, speaking through an interpreter. “Events show that what is needed is a re-pivot, and that Europe was safe and secure because America was in Europe.”

Needless to say Tomasz Siemoniak can only be speculating when addressing issues of overall US strategy. However, Poland’s musings can be understood as a statement of hope rather than fact. Poland is saying if the US revives its strategic posture then Europe can be defended.  It’s a conditional, if-then. The converse of that — the “else” — is of course obvious to all, though perhaps I should not say “all”.

James Jeffrey, a U.S. ambassador to Iraq in the Obama administration, actually proposed a tripwire as far forward as Ukraine before it was overtaken by events. Writing in the Washington Post only last week Jeffrey said:

The best way to send Putin a tough message and possibly deflect a Russian campaign against more vulnerable NATO states is to back up our commitment to the sanctity of NATO territory with ground troops, the only military deployment that can make such commitments unequivocal. …

While examples of effective ground force “tripwires” date to the U.S. brigade in Berlin during the Cold War, the most relevant recent example is Kuwait after 1993. To deter Saddam Hussein from any new attack, the United States maintained a “heavy brigade package” of armor and other materiel to equip a force of 5,000 troops to be quickly flown in if needed. The United States and Britain also maintained fighter aircraft in Kuwait. All this, however, was not sufficient to fully deter Hussein. U.S. ground forces were deployed in 1994, 1996 and 1997-98. Even with equipment already deployed, it took time to fly the troops in, and the decisions required precious time for Washington and the Kuwaiti government to deliberate.

To deal with these issues, the Clinton administration finally stationed a small ground force in Kuwait, rotated from stateside units on six-month deployments. In a crisis, the thinking went, it would buy time for a full brigade to deploy and encourage rapid Kuwaiti deployment, possibly deterring a ground attack. In Operation Desert Fox in December 1998, the United States went with the force on the ground, rapidly reinforced by a Marine expeditionary unit, rather than wait for a brigade to deploy and thus signal its intentions to Hussein.

Tripwire strategies have a long history in Democratic administrations. The interesting thing about tripwire strategies is that they are not seriously intended to prevent the enemy from advancing.  They are too small.

The purpose of a tripwire deployment is to make it impossible for Washington to retreat. Thus, a US brigade in Poland is not designed to keep Putin from moving forward. It’s designed to nail Obama to the ground, to keep him from running away.

Obama’s not going to get much help from the Western Europeans. Recently Max Fisher, writing in Vox, attributed Obama’s collapse in Ukraine to Europe. “Obama’s Ukraine plan relies on Europe, and that’s why it’s failing.”  Soft power apparently has its limits. Europe can offer divisions of treaties, brigades of bureaucrats, entire fleets of human rights lawyers, and legion upon legion of quangos. But they are less than useful in this situation.

It is possible that Poland required the tripwire as a price for playing “a leading regional role”. Maybe Obama had run out of credit and Warsaw wanted a deposit before betting the farm. The tripwire is the deposit. Clearly, Poland is taking the principal geostrategic risk. They are betting the cavalry will come. But there’s always the chance it won’t. As one wag on Facebook said, “oh another country for Obama to lose.” If Poland is wrong it loses its freedom. If Obama is wrong he get’s to say “there will be costs” before an rapt audience of journalists.

In the short term however, and before Obama decides — if he ever does — on rebuilding forces, Putin has many options for mischief. The most obvious countermove is for Moscow to interrupt the northern supply route into Afghanistan. Or Putin might ask Syria and Iran to terminate their “negotiations” with president Obama. There’s a fourth option for mischief. Putin can declare himself threatened by the report of a US deployment so far east and move his actual border closer up to Poland itself by gobbling up more of Ukraine.

Odds are we are going to see some of those countermoves used against Obama.

The net effect will be to force Obama to do either do what Poland hopes — pivot to Europe — or clearly abandon it. Pivoting to Europe must leave the Pacific exposed. To cover all bases Obama will have to postpone his plan to fundamentally transform America into a welfare-type state and use that money to rebuild the military. Poland may be trying to hustle Obama into being decisive, but the president’s instincts have so far been against it. If there’s one thing Obama won’t do, it is stop the flow of goodies to his domestic constituencies. That is his power base and Obama may love domestic political power more than he loves Poland.

To underscore that reluctance the president delayed the Keystone XL pipeline yet again. “The Obama administration on Friday extended the review period on the Keystone XL pipeline, perhaps pushing back a final decision on the disputed project until after the Nov. 4 congressional elections. … environmental groups hailed it as a sign that the project will not move forward.”

If there was one non-kinetic way of showing resolve against Putin it would be ramping US energy production. Energy exports are the wellsprings of Putin’s power. If Obama wanted to beggar Putin, he would turn on the faucet. But he won’t. You might well ask: how serious is Obama about stopping Putin when he can’t even stand up to the Sierra Club?  Twitter, always a source amusement these days, had a Tweet going: “Headlines. Putin invades Ukraine. Obama responds by invading Nevada.”

How would you like to be on the tripwire force?


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Top Rated Comments   
A trip wire implies that there is something coming once the wire is tripped. What could the Russians do that would get a US response? Raping an American ambassador didn't get a rise out of Obama so kinetically neutralizing a US battalion is unlikely to matter. Even if Obama wanted to respond the question would be, with what?

When the Norks took the Pueblo we discovered that the only units ready to respond were Air Force planes on strip alert, and they all had nuclear weapons. With no other option but stand down or start WW-III we choose to let the ship get taken into Wonson harbor. Now under Obama we have neither a conventional nor a backing tactical nuclear option that could lead to escalation. The purpose of the tactical nukes were to provide a credible link between losing conventional forces and a full MAD strategic response. It wasn't that the tactical nukes were sure to decide the battlefield outcome and end the war, although as a war fighting option they raised the expected costs enough to help deterrence, it is that they made it more likely that a limited conventional assault by the Russians would escalate to a thermonuclear apocalypse. That increased the deterrence value of the Black Horse regiment standing tripwire duty at Fulda, and that, along with the investment in a Reforger capability, is what kept the peace. All those backing forces, nuclear and conventional, are now gone. Now if the Russians attack we either order our Boomers to launch 200 ICBMs, and does anybody believe that would happen?, or we do nothing.

The public does not get this. They think that sending a trip wire matters because they think that something is behind it. They assume that someplace we really still have all the forces we had 30 years ago. Maybe they are in a CMDF box with Obama's magic cash stash. If we still had the number of military forces we had before the Peace Dividend draw down base closing and domestic spending binge then credibility would still be a problem with Obama in charge, especially if Putin thinks that he has an agent in place, but knowledge that US forces could act independently, shoot the radio, would induce caution. If we had any other POTUS in place even with our shrunken force structure, and while some but not all of our units are new and improved quantity matters, then that might induce hesitation. Now we have the worst of both and the only constraint on Putin is his internal schedule. My guess is that he will continue salami tactics instead of making a big push. It is hard however to make predictions, especially about the future.
23 weeks ago
23 weeks ago Link To Comment
I hear the number of troops will be 130. I think Michelle Obama's personal staff is more than that. Obama and Reid sent 200 plus BLM SS troops to face off with Bundy and his scary cows. The country has gone mad.
23 weeks ago
23 weeks ago Link To Comment
Why defend the borders of other countries, when we will not defend our own borders?
23 weeks ago
23 weeks ago Link To Comment
All Comments   (93)
All Comments   (93)
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removed by author...
23 weeks ago
23 weeks ago Link To Comment
Gridley: "We may eventually have to fight Russia, and if we do, it would be better to do so in Poland, or the Ukraine, than on the East coast of the US."

This is the part I simply do not get. Why would the US ever have to fight today's Russia? (And I am trying not to let my judgment be overly affected by all those beautiful Russian ladies).

We the people of the US have no interest in world domination. Russia may want to be given respect, but that does not make it an enemy of the US. Russia may want to dominate Europe -- OK, let the Russians and the Europeans sort that one out between themselves. A lot of Americans have no desire to expend blood and treasure saving a bunch of ungrateful European Fascists, just so that they can go back to whining about the US again.

And if Russia did in a moment of insanity invade the East Coast of the US, let's hope we are smart enough to delay any military response until the Russians have thoroughly raped & pillaged DC and its surrounding counties. That is the place where the real enemy of the US resides; those are the people that some day we will indeed have to fight.
23 weeks ago
23 weeks ago Link To Comment
--i think it's an alphabet war. Look at Syria --half a dozen combatants, every one a different alphabet, comprising the world's top alphabets (calling Japanese and Chinese both as Kanje, which they are) save for Devanagari. Look at the word itself, alphabet, why, it's the Alpha Bet! I bet on the Latin to wind up the Alpha, because that's the one i'm floont on.
23 weeks ago
23 weeks ago Link To Comment
Some people go to the opera to watch an opera. Other people go to the opera to be seen at an opera.

When rating the effectiveness of diplomatic talks, one needs to consider what one desires to accomplish. One can seek to get stuff done or one can seek to make the Secretary of State look like a hot shot. They are two different things.

Wretchard, the problem you have is that you see diplomacy as a means to get tangible results for ordinary people when the actual purpose of American diplomacy is to make John Kerry look important. Why should this be a surprise?
23 weeks ago
23 weeks ago Link To Comment
JFK wants his own Nobel or Pulitzer or something, Israel be ... destroyed... after all what does it matter now? Trade traitors freedom for continuation of the talks.
Quiestion is, did he fumble the baton passed by HRC?
23 weeks ago
23 weeks ago Link To Comment
Until the recent talks in Geneva, the Russian government did not recognize the Ukrainian government. By having both Russia and Ukraine sit at the same table with the United States and the EU, Obama gained a partial victory by creating the impression that Russia recognizes the Euromaidan regime in Ukraine as legitimate enough to negotiate with.

Although the Geneva agreement itself is nonsense to make it look like John Kerry achieved something, the meeting itself is a concession by Russia. Of course, the meeting itself is also a victory for Russia, for it illustrates what the Russian government can get away with – and still get invited to negotiate.

John Kerry's Geneva talks are rather like a dancing bear. People don't marvel at how a bear dances just as well as a ballerina at the Bolshoi Theater; people marvel at how a bear dances at all. By the standard one one has come to expect from the Obama administration, the Geneva talks went well.
23 weeks ago
23 weeks ago Link To Comment
and Crimea was de facto considered as russian too
23 weeks ago
23 weeks ago Link To Comment
If past ownership and sovereignty are determinative on the future, regardless of intervening events ....

I believe Alsace and Lorraine were Germanic territories; ruled by the Germanic Alemmani before the Holy Roman Empire. In the breakup of that after the death of Karl der Grosse's son Louis; they were given to Lothair as part of a Germanic kingdom. Ownership has traded back and forth repeatedly between France and Germany over the centuries. By your logic, the issue of who owns Alsace-Lorraine is still in doubt, and if the Germans retake it at some point in the future they have at least as much right on their side as France.

Or perhaps since all of what became France was Celtic; perhaps Brittany and the Vendee should claim the country?

[fire in the hole!]

Subotai Bahadur
23 weeks ago
23 weeks ago Link To Comment
you haven't understood, during the Genneva meeting none quoted Crimea, it was like Crimea's case was admitted as being over

What has Alsace to do with Genova?

While you're at it, let me remind you that the Holy Roman Empire wasn't a kingdom nor a federation of states , but auonome lands, cities, that elected a Emperor wih no real power, apart when quarrels between landords happened, he was requested to mediate between the parties

Alsace only spoke a german dialect (not understood by the other german lands), Alemani yes, while Lorraine was Frank, apparented to Luxemburg , where a Luxemburgeoise dialect was spoken, a mixture of german dialect, and french, like every provinces in France had their own dialect, until the beginning of the 20th century when french teaching was generalised in state schools.

Besides of that these eastern provinces were happy to pass under french protection, that ment more security for them since the Holy Roman Empire was at war for long times and had no proper army for defending individual lands. Plus they lept their autonomy as far as domestic government, the only thing that they couldn't do it's to raise troops. Today still these provinces kept their autonomy.

Alsace-Lorraine became French at the Wesphalia treaty, in 1648, therefore it had more than 2 and a half centuries of french rules when Bismarck annexed it. Naturally that the people there weren't happy to pass under german rules , that were strict prussian rules, that forbid french in schools and administrations, that removed the villages names into more germanic names...

you can't say that they didn't belong to France, since they didn't ask for becoming German they were taken by force by Germany, not because they spoke a german dialect, but because Lorraine had iron mines, and Alsace potasse, that the new born Bismarck industry needed badly, since Germany had almost coal, and for the modernisation of Germany's agriculture

Today these province do not represent any interest for Germany anymore, the coal and iron mines (remember, that was the purpose of the first union created by the league of nations first, then at the origin of the EU project) are closed, and potasse has dried up, so there's no threat upon them anymore

France wasn't only celtic, but also roman, basque, iberic, catalunia too, brittons, normans, flanders... France is a melting pot of several populations, that is why the lanscape is so different from one province to another one

and our mental geography didn't change since the Revolution, when everyone got the same right, even in alsace Lorraine

23 weeks ago
23 weeks ago Link To Comment
plus they kept their autonomy...

sorry typo
23 weeks ago
23 weeks ago Link To Comment
Yes, If I recall Louis XIV ethnically cleansed Germans from huge areas west of the Rhine. This was wrong, mmmkay.

I may not recall. I can never keep all those Louis's straight.

But yeah, I think Alsace and Lorrain- or rather Elsass and Lothringen rightfully belong to Deutschland.

Because history.
23 weeks ago
23 weeks ago Link To Comment
you're a stoopid ignorant (for not saying a racist idiot)

Never the French cleansed Germans from Alsace since, first, they weren't Germans, but alsacians,, sorry we aren't for volkish cleansing , otherwise the whole country would had to be removed of its population

23 weeks ago
23 weeks ago Link To Comment
True, the St Bart's Day Massacre was ignified by a Medici, and the Vendee Genocide that Lenin modeled on, happened after the head of Robespierre had rolled into a wicker basket, so the VG had to've been a mere blue city vs red state affair, complexed by the Church vs Anti-Church overlay --nothing inherently French about either of those history-shakers which just happened to have happened in the only one-world city of the times, Paris.
23 weeks ago
23 weeks ago Link To Comment
didn't see that your own civil was more human than ours too
23 weeks ago
23 weeks ago Link To Comment
But you are factually wrong there. There was absolutely no equivalent in our Civil War to the repeated massacres of helpless civilians.

Billy Sherman's March to the Sea, and Lawrenceville, Kansas featured not even a small fraction of a percent of the murder victims of either St. Bart's or Vendee, or the Reign of Terror, for that matter, or the Genocide of the Cathars either for another matter.
23 weeks ago
23 weeks ago Link To Comment
Here is a music video to cheer you up about the future of NATO

The Black Watch marching to the sound of bagpipes playing Scotland the Brave.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OyWdM_OzLbU&feature=youtu.be&t=2m30s
23 weeks ago
23 weeks ago Link To Comment
I noted the dark-complected Scots--must be getting more sunlight up there.
23 weeks ago
23 weeks ago Link To Comment
Sadly, this does not say anything encouraging about the defense of Europe. The Black Watch, while it has varied in size over its history [in WW-I the Regiment was 25 battalions]; it and all Highland Regiments have been slashed. From a Regiment, it has been downgraded to a single battalion. It is now 3rd Battalion Black Watch. That does not mean that there are at least two other battalions of the Regiment. It means that it is the 3rd Battalion of the Royal Regiment of Scotland and all that is left of the Black Watch. The RRS is all that is left of 6 full Highland Regiments: Black Watch, the Royal Scots, the King's Own Scottish Borderers, the Royal Highland Fusiliers, The Highlanders and the Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders, with one understrength battalion each. What was in the parade was the entire Black Watch. Not enough to defend Blackpool, let alone any significant part of Europe.

I note that they are so underfunded, that when pulling ceremonial guard duty, Highland units have to pass kilts from person to person in the unit, and have for years. They cannot afford to have each person mounting guard have their own kilt.

Not that I did not like the pipes, I just prefer to have enough Highlanders behind them.

Subotai Bahadur
23 weeks ago
23 weeks ago Link To Comment
And if Scotland, in a fit of stupidity, actually seceeds from the UK, what happens to those remaining few? Scotland won't be able to afford them. (Scotland is already past the tipping point with over 50% on welfare, paid for by the balance of the island.)
England and Wales won't man the battalions with their own.
And the free world will be without some very fierce and competent soldiers.
and the beep goes on.
(On my bucket list, learn the pipes)
23 weeks ago
23 weeks ago Link To Comment
Frig Europe and frig NATO. Those people treat us like the Greeks treat the Germans. Let them defend themselves. They have made it horrifyingly clear that is exactly the way they feel about us.
23 weeks ago
23 weeks ago Link To Comment
What you write about Europe may be true, but that doesn't change the fact that it's NOT in our interest to allow Russia to annex a significant portion of eastern Europe.

We may eventually have to fight Russia, and if we do, it would be better to do so in Poland, or the Ukraine, than on the East coast of the US.
23 weeks ago
23 weeks ago Link To Comment
http://www.bing.com/search?q=western+lawmakers+meet+to+take+federal+lands&form=IE8SRC&src=IE-SearchBox

This could solve e-v-e-r-y-t-h-i-n-g (from depression/collapse of USA/WWIII, on down the list, on down, down the list, all the way to just short of Doug using my moniker adumbrated)
23 weeks ago
23 weeks ago Link To Comment
...
23 weeks ago
23 weeks ago Link To Comment
Sir/Madam: How do you pronounce your moniker?
23 weeks ago
23 weeks ago Link To Comment
Since you ask -- I have never heard the word pronounced by a person with the standing to say it correctly. By analogy, it would be pretty much as written --
kin - uu - ach - drach, with maybe a slight emphasis on the second syllable.

It is the name of a farm at the north end of the Scottish island of Jura, which reputedly was the image George Orwell had in mind when he wrote "Animal Farm". Orwell wrote the manuscript while staying in a house owned by his publisher a few miles south of the farm. Apparently, the owners have kept that house in pretty much the condition it was when Orwell was there, and now rent it out to those who are interested.

If you like tongue-twisters, just off the coast of Jura near Kinuachdrach there lies the tidal whirlpool of Corryvreckan.
23 weeks ago
23 weeks ago Link To Comment
For those who are curious, Wikipedia has a picture

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Barnhill,_Jura

This report says

In fact Orwell was not the last man on Jura, much less in Europe, because a crofting family lived a mile further on at Kinuachdrachd. This croft is now occupied by Mike Richardson, his wife Joan and a menagerie that includes a herd of goats, two geese, a one-eyed collie, a donkey and a blue-fronted Amazon green parrot called Charlie who came to Jura via a Liverpool pub.


http://www.telegraph.co.uk/travel/727879/Scotland-The-road-to-Big-Brothers-house.html


More pictures

http://sailing.agurney.com/list-of-anchorages/kinuachdrachd
23 weeks ago
23 weeks ago Link To Comment
Kinuachdrach, We may be able to answer your question by reverse engineering, Using Wretchard's April 1st, 2014 – “Four Simple Words” column, of course using some of the input from this column it paints a very, very scary picture, one where Putin could be the next “Alexander the Great” (I am sure China gets a vote in this).
23 weeks ago
23 weeks ago Link To Comment
In reel life, you know, Alexander the Great is father to the Midnight Cowboy's grandchildren. Imagine the conversation over Thanksgiving dinner --"I Rule the World!" exclaims Alexander the Great. "Ahhh, there IS no 'world'," mutters the Midnight Cowboy....
23 weeks ago
23 weeks ago Link To Comment
The key question which needs to be addressed is -- What is Russia's objective? (We all know what Soetero's objective is).

Some say Russia wants to rebuild the USSR. If that were the case, the prime targets would be the energy- & minerals-rich 'Stans. Yet there is little evidence of Russia seeking to reconquer the 'Stans.

Some are assuming that Russia wants to take over Europe, preferably without fighting a war. But Russia has already set the groundwork for that, through the usual Gramscian methods which have also worked so well in the US. It was a triumph when Germany -- desperately dependent on Russian fossil fuels -- decided to abandon nuclear power. Why take dangerous military action when contributions to "Green" idiot organizations are cheaper & more effective?

Some say Russia is really in a defensive mode, concerned about aggressive behavior by the dangerous idiots of the EU moving ever-closer to their borders. Russia's actions in Georgia and Ukraine are arguably consistent with that interpretation.

For the US, the best approach would be to assume that Russia is acting defensively and support Russia's efforts to put a de-militarized buffer between themselves and the EU. If that turns out to be wrong, and Russia conquers Europe -- Oh Well! We can live with it.
23 weeks ago
23 weeks ago Link To Comment
Kin, I think you are being too rational.

I think for Russians of a certain age and above who remember the Soviet Union, the Baltic States and particularly the Ukraine belong to Russia, just as they did under the Soviet Union.

It is an emotional attachment made even more powerful by the fact that so many Russians live in those places. You are correct, the Stans make a much more profitable and rational conquest, but emotionally they are and always were even under the Soviet Union - "foreign". The Ukraine, and the Baltics are not "foreign" to these people - they are in their minds 'Russia".
23 weeks ago
23 weeks ago Link To Comment
But then what are our objectives? Clearly they must be to counter Russia's persistent use of "Gramscian methods which have worked so well in the US".

We have enough trouble with Ali-Bama and his Forty Thieves that we definitely do NOT need Putin spreading his disinformation among the LIVS. So we need to support freedom lovers in Russia. Why not broadcast the message that more people are speaking their minds in Russian in the Ukraine than in Russia?

How do you say "the truth hurts' in Russian?

Or "a culture of corruption"?

http://articles.latimes.com/2001/sep/30/news/mn-51655

Or just go back to the Syrian mess and call Old Pootie Poo "Babykiller"?

I'm sure those old sixties radicals in the White house have used that term before. Especially, John "The Winter Soldier" Kerry, an 'expert' on Ghengis Khan.
23 weeks ago
23 weeks ago Link To Comment
You might say, "Больно узнать правду."

("Volnah uznats pravdu.")(transliteration approximate)

Which is more like "Learning the Truth is Painful." ("Painful to learn truth...")

Strange language, eh?

The second is easier: "Вашингтон, округ Колумбия."

>:)
23 weeks ago
23 weeks ago Link To Comment
Or we can dig up his public record of "Gramscian methods" such as sending out Viktor Mikhailov to recommend nuking the BP oil spill.

http://www.reuters.com/article/2010/07/02/us-oil-spill-nukes-idUSTRE6611RF20100702

(Reuters) - His face wracked by age and his voice rasping after decades of chain-smoking coarse tobacco, the former long-time Russian Minister of nuclear energy and veteran Soviet physicist Viktor Mikhailov knows just how to fix BP's oil leak in the Gulf of Mexico.

"A nuclear explosion over the leak," he says nonchalantly puffing a cigarette as he sits in a conference room at the Institute of Strategic Stability, where he is a director. "I don't know what BP is waiting for, they are wasting their time. Only about 10 kilotons of nuclear explosion capacity and the problem is solved."


Heck, even Ali-Bama wasn't STUPID enough to buy that one! Though Bill Clinton bought into the conventional explosives idea. As one wag put it, "What difference, at this point, does it make"?


FREE KURT MIX!

CHU LIED, DOLPHINS DIED, CHILDREN CRIED!!!
23 weeks ago
23 weeks ago Link To Comment
Hey all you LIVs out there, who's (memo to uddy arsen who is = who's) NUMBER ONE at the box office?

CAPTAIN 'THE WINTER SOLDER' AMERICA, that's (that is = that's) who!!!
23 weeks ago
23 weeks ago Link To Comment
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