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Selling Your Writing To The Public

Things to consider before you embrace indie publishing.

by
Sarah Hoyt

Bio

November 2, 2013 - 2:00 pm
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setting up shop by the side of the information superhighway can be a daunting endeavor.

setting up shop by the side of the information superhighway can be a daunting endeavor.

Selling your writing in 13 weeks, week 4

So, you’ve decided to eschew traditional publishing.  It takes too long, or there aren’t many choices, or you think that you don’t have a chance, or you’d rather start making money now, even if it will be less, or you want to cut out the middle man and reach the public.  Last but not least, you might have decided that the best chance at breaking into traditional publishing is to be a success at indie.

All right.

First, note that last sentence, above.  You needn’t abandon all hope (of traditional publishing) once you enter here.  No, in fact there is a very good chance this will be your path to traditional publishing.  My colleague Larry Correia did just that.  He published Monster Hunter International, was a success, and is now happily publishing with Baen books.

Is it guaranteed?  Nothing in life is guaranteed, particularly for writers and particularly right now.

But if you’re going to try this Indie thing, there are ways and ways to do it.

Before we set off, always remember “Money Flows To The Writer.”  This is the same as in traditional publishing.  If you remember that and “If it sounds too good to be true, it probably is” you’ll probably keep off the biggest pitfalls.

Now, let’s start with some decisions you have to make.

So – you’re going indie.  But how?

Are you going to self-publish?  Go in with a group of friends? Go with an established small or micro publisher?

Which is it best to do?

I can’t make that decision for you – it’s all on how you feel about it, how much work you’re willing to do and how much self confidence you have.  In fact, you probably will want to try all three forms.

First, let’s consider small or micro publishers – the same process for submitting to them applies as for submitting to the majors.  They are usually faster, more responsive and willing to give a try to an unknown.  But they aren’t ALWAYS that.  Some of them are just as bad as the traditionals. And some are worse.  For instance, some of them have worse contracts and some of them are very new and have clue zero how to parse out payments.  (This is not as easy as you might think.  The way electronic outlets pay can get maddening.)

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