Tucker: Main Threat to Freedom No Longer Big Government — It's Big Corporations Like Google

"The federal government is no longer the main threat to your privacy and to your freedoms," Fox News host Tucker Carlson declared Tuesday night on his show. "Big corporations are the main threat to your freedom and your privacy. The government doesn't own your private emails," he added. "Google does."

James Damore, the former Google engineer who filed a class-action lawsuit against Google in California this week, appeared on Tucker Carlson Tonight along with his lawyer, Harmeet K. Dhillon, to discuss his lawsuit.

Damore was fired after he circulated a paper questioning the company's bizarre SJW diversity policies.

"Federal employees can't be fired for their political views," Tucker pointed out. "Private sector employees are all the time. The Trump administration can't end your ability to publicly communicate your ideas. Twitter and Facebook can do that -- and they do do it all the time. The Orwellian future is increasingly the Orwellian present and tech barons are becoming our new commissars," he argued.

Addressing Damore, Carlson said, "Google seemed to feel the need to vilify you after you got fired -- to discredit you, to attack your character, and to encourage others to do the same. That seems Stalinist."

According to the complaint, a director at Google even “advocated for physical violence against Damore.”

He asked Damore why he thought Google felt the need to do that.

"Because I attacked their orthodoxy and they really needed to send a message to other employees," Damore answered.

Carlson remarked that the fact Google paid bonuses to people who denounced him was like "a Khmer Rouge re-education session."

The Fox host then turned to Dhillon: "In this complaint, you have example after example of Google targeting people on the basis of their race and their sex," he said. "My impression was that that was illegal."

Dhillon agreed. "It is illegal," she replied. "It's illegal under federal law, it's illegal under California law. And what a lot of lawyers even around the country don't understand that under California law, we have a unique labor code provision that makes it illegal to discriminate against somebody on the basis of their political activities or their political views."

"Google is the most powerful company in the world, the most famous company in the world, and they're doing this openly," Tucker said incredulously. "They don't seem to have worried that they're going to get in trouble for violating a pretty basic law."

But Dhillon pointed out that Google is a ubiquitous company and that they've been getting away with it for a long time.

"Do you think that being at odds with Google is going to affect your future employment prospects?" Carlson asked Damore.

"Yes, definitely, and many employees have made it clear that they're spreading the message about not only me -- but anyone that they've discovered that has certain viewpoints, to blackball them out of careers within Silicon Valley."

"So why is that not terrifying?" the appalled Tucker asked.

"Oh, I think it is!" Damore answered, laughing.

Dhillon said that threat of a blacklist of conservatives was not only within Google but "within the entire tech community throughout the United States."

"That's how scary this is," she concluded.