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Greenpeace Founding Member: 'The Whole Climate Crisis Is Not Only Fake News, It's Fake Science'

On Tuesday morning, Patrick Moore, a founding member of the environmentalist organization Greenpeace, slammed climate alarmists for promoting a fake emergency. President Donald Trump tweeted Moore's remarks shortly after he made them.

"In fact, the whole climate crisis as they call it is not only fake news, it’s fake science. There is no climate crisis," Moore, author of the book Confessions of a Greenpeace Drop-Out: The Making of a Sensible Environmentalist, told "Fox & Friends" Tuesday morning.

"There is weather and climate all around the world. And, in fact, carbon dioxide is the main building block of all life," Moore said. "That’s where the carbon comes from in carbon-based life, which is all life on land and in the sea. And not only that, a little bit of warming would not be a bad thing for myself being a Canadian and the people in Russia wouldn’t mind a little couple of degrees warmer either."

The Greenpeace founding member did not deny that climate change is real, but he insisted that it is not a crisis.

"Yes, of course, climate change is real. It’s been happening since the beginning of time. But it’s not dangerous and it’s not made by people," Moore insisted.

What is climate change, if it's not a man-made imminent crisis? "Climate change is a perfectly natural phenomenon and this modern warm period actually began about 300 years ago when Little Ice Age began to come to an end," he explained. "There is nothing to be afraid of."

As for the alarmists, "that’s all they are doing is instilling fear. Most of the scientists who are saying it’s a crisis are on perpetual government grants."

Yet there is a fundamental contradiction between their claims, Moore insisted. "On one hand they say the science is settled and people like myself should just shut up because they know what’s right. On the other hand, they seem to keep studying it forever as if there is something new to find out. And those two things are completely contradictory," he said.

The Greenpeace founding member even argued that "carbon dioxide is actually a benefit to the world." He promoted the CO2 Coalition, which believes "that carbon dioxide is entirely beneficial to both the environment, to agriculture and forestry and to the climate of the Earth."

If Patrick Moore believes in carbon dioxide as a benefit to the climate, how could he have helped found Greenpeace? He argued that it was the organization that changed from its original mission, not him.

"I was one of the founders doing a Ph.D. in the late '60s, early '70s in ecology. I was radicalized by the Cold War and the threat of all-out nuclear war and the emerging consciousness of the environment and we did a lot of good things," he recalled. "We stopped nuclear testing in Alaska. We have stopped it in the South Pacific. We saved the whales. And we stopped a lot of toxic waste being put into the ocean. And the air."

"But, by the mid-'80s we had gained a lot of notoriety and we were bringing in a lot of money and we were hijacked by the extreme Left who basically took Greenpeace from a science-based organization to an organization based on sensationalism, misinformation, and fear," Moore insisted.

The Greenpeace founding member echoed an argument he made against the Green New Deal on "Tucker Carlson Tonight" Monday evening.

Moore said he opposed the climate plan proposed by Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (D-N.Y.) "because it would be basically the end of civilization if 85 percent of the world's and also 85 percent of the U.S.’s energy — in the form of coal, oil, and natural gas — were phased out over the next few years. Like, ten years. We do not have anything to replace them with."

Nuclear reactors might be able to meet those needs, "but that isn’t going to happen because the greens are against nuclear, and they’re even against hydroelectric dams, which at least is renewable. But they don’t support that either, so basically, they are opposed to approximately 98.5 percent of all the electricity that we are using and nearly 100 percent of all the vehicle and transportation and ships and plans energy that we are using."

Moore argued that the biggest problem with phasing out fossil fuels entirely would be mass starvation in the cities. Transporting food from farms to cities "requires large trucks, and there’s not going to be any electric tracks any time soon hauling 40 tons of food into the supermarkets where the people in the cities probably think it originates in the supermarket. But it does not."

Without fossil fuels and the trucks that run on them, food could not travel from the farms to the center of New York or to Manhattan, where AOC is from," he said. Without trucks, "the people there will begin to starve. ... Half the population will die in a very short period of time."

On "Fox & Friends," Patrick Moore was even blunter. "The fact is you cannot do agriculture for eight billion people — produce the food for eight billion people — without fossil fuels as far as we know it. We don’t have an alternative, especially for transportation. Which is over 90 percent dependent on fossil fuels," he said.

Burning fossil fuels may even have a positive impact on the environment, the Greenpeace founding member argued.

"The fact is 85 percent of the world’s energy is from fossil fuels. And the carbon dioxide being emitted from burning it was actually taken out of the atmosphere and the oceans millions of years ago and stored in sediments," Moore said. "We are now releasing it back into the atmosphere where it can fertilize the life on Earth."

"Carbon dioxide and water are the two main constituents of all life. Carbohydrates and, of course, fossil fuels are hydrocarbons just missing the oxygen. When you burn them, the oxygen is recombined with carbon to form the carbon dioxide. People need to learn more about the chemistry," he quipped.

"This is fake science and driving a very dangerous movement on the energy front," Moore repeated.

President Donald Trump tweeted about Moore's interview, citing the "Fake Science" line in particular.

"Patrick Moore, co-founder of Greenpeace: 'The whole climate crisis is not only Fake News, it’s Fake Science. There is no climate crisis, there’s weather and climate all around the world, and in fact carbon dioxide is the main building block of all life,'" Trump tweeted, adding "Wow!"

Greenpeace disputed the claim that Patrick Moore is a co-founder of the organization.

"Patrick Moore was not a co-founder of Greenpeace. He does not represent Greenpeace. He is a paid lobbyist, not an independent source," the organization tweeted. "His statements about [Ocasio-Cortez] & the [Green New Deal] have nothing to do with our positions."

Moore was heavily involved in the early years of Greenpeace. While he did not help found the original organization, the "Don't Make a Wave Committee," he joined the crew of the vessel Phyllis Cormack, which later took on the name "Greenpeace." The organization took its name from that vessel.

Patrick Moore is not listed among the founders of Greenpeace on the website, but he clearly had an early leading role in the organization.

In 2011, the Wall Street Journal dubbed Moore a "founding member" of the organization. PJ Media has adopted this description.

Watch the segment below.

An earlier version of this article referred to Patrick Moore as a “co-founder” of Greenpeace. While that description is defensible, PJ Media decided to refer to him as a “founding member” for accuracy.

Follow Tyler O'Neil, the author of this article, on Twitter at @Tyler2ONeil.