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Carter Page Is Suing the U.S. Government for One Dollar

Carter Page on Fox news with Martha MacCallum. Image via Youtube.

For the past year and a half, former Trump campaign adviser Carter Page has been the focus of the special counsel’s investigation into collusion between Trump associates and Russian officials during the 2016 presidential election, and all sorts of accusations have been flying his way.

After many months of being on the defensive, Page is now taking a more offensive stance, spurred by the release of the FISA abuse memo showing that the FBI used the Clinton-funded, anti-Trump dossier to obtain a FISA warrant to spy on him before the 2016 election.

On the day the House Intelligence Committee released the FISA memo, Page  updated his defamation lawsuits against various news organizations for publishing defamatory stories about him. He is also suing the United States government for being the source of those stories.

Page filed a 400-page defamation lawsuit against Yahoo and the Huffington Post in September

The suit also targeted the Broadcasting Board of Governors, whose outlets Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty, both controlled by the United States, wrote an account based off of the Yahoo article. According to Page, the federal government helped to spread the allegations against him.

The foreign policy analyst told Fox News’ Martha MacCallum on Tuesday that he is suing the U.S. government for one dollar, hoping that in the future it will  “start acting responsibly.”

Page said the Russian bot farm indicted by Special Counsel Mueller last week was actually a pretty minor operation compared to what the United States has been up to.

“You compare that to Broadcasting Board of Governors, a U.S. federal agency, which is funding Radio Free Europe and others that are putting out these defamatory articles against the Trump movement,” Page argued.

Page said that the defamatory articles Radio Free Europe was posting about the Trump campaign and himself included links to share the information via Facebook, Twitter, Linke In, etc. All paid for by American taxpayers.

The Broadcasting Board of Governors’ budget for Radio Free Europe in 2017 was $100,000, he said.

Carter Page is not alone in his criticism of the Broadcasting Board of Governors. A growing chorus of critics is ringing alarm bells about the wayward agency.

The Wall Street Journal editorial board, in fact, urged the president to dismiss the current board and nominate “a CEO who’s more attuned to foreign policy and the fight for freedom.”

“I’m hoping that as they’re now entering phase two in the House Intelligence Committee, they’ll get to the bottom of all that,” he said.

“You believe it [Russia collusion narrative] is coming apart?” MacCallum asked.

“Big time,” Page answered.

The Fox News host asked him what he meant when he said that the collapse of the Russia narrative would “set people free.”

“If you look at the civil rights abuses that were taken against me and other members of the Trump movement …” Page began, gathering his thoughts. “Again — all of my communications were hacked and wiretapped for over a year. And, you know, you think about the tremendous resources that took — not only in terms of fake news U.S. government propaganda in 2016, but even with the FBI. The wiretap for me was issued on October 21, 2016, and was renewed three times, ninety days each. So that would have gone to October 2017,” he said.

MacCallum asked Page if he thought that he was being used as a doorway to spy on other Trump associates.

“Of course,” he answered.

Page admitted to feeling like a bit of a “patsy,” as Don Jr. had called him, because he had not fought back against the propaganda earlier. “I think it –you know — might have potentially helped,” he said.

Asked if he was suing the U.S. government over what it did, he answered “absolutely.”

“All I want from the U.S. government is one dollar,” he said. “And to start acting responsibly.”

Page added that the country seems to be turning a corner now that Attorney General Jeff Sessions is finally “taking steps.”

“I’m quite optimistic,” he said.