Trump Mulls Taking Action on Homelessness in California

Since the ultra-left governments of Los Angeles and San Francisco can't bring themselves to do what's necessary to address the crisis of homelessness in California, the Trump administration may end up doing it for them.

CBS Los Angeles:

The White House is reportedly looking to become more actively involved in the homeless crisis in California.

Speaking at a Politico event Monday evening in Beverly Hills, Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti's chief of state Breelyn Pete said a “very large delegation” from the Trump Administration was in town for a scheduled meeting on homelessness, according to Politico.

The delegation – which reportedly includes White House, Department of Housing and Urban Development, and Domestic Policy Council officials – are expected to hold talks with the mayor’s office, Politico reported.

Pete reportedly told the crowd at the United Talent Agency event that talks will focus on “homelessness and sanitation deployment and Skid Row engagement”.

Incredibly, typhus — a medieval disease almost completely eliminated when U.S. cities started to pay attention to basic sanitation — has made a comeback in California and has reached epidemic status.

Other diseases are also making a comeback in California.

Global Research:

Despite hundreds of millions of dollars flowing through Los Angeles to stem the rising tide of  homelessness, a resurgence of medieval diseases has the city – and neighboring states – on edge. Typhoid fever and typhus, borne by fleas, body lice, and feces, are turning the once glitzy and glamorous city into a third-world worthy environment. Yes, Typhoid Mary is back, in a sense, living on the streets and wreaking havoc on unsuspecting people in the Golden State.

These diseases, along with an uptick in tuberculosis, hepatitis A, and staph, are easily and rapidly spread and have wide-reaching consequences. They’re highly contagious and can infect anyone through casual contact.

Are you ready for a leprosy outbreak in La La Land?

The Hill:

According to the CDC, there are between 100 and 200 new cases of leprosy reported in the U.S. every year. A  study just released from the Keck Medical Center at the University of Southern California looked at 187 leprosy patients treated at its clinic from 1973 to 2018 and found that most were Latino, originating from Mexico, where the disease is somewhat more common, and that there was on average a three-year delay in diagnosis, during which time the side effects of the disease — usually irreversible, even with treatment — began to occur.

Disease, unaffordable housing -- this does not have to happen. It happens because the radicals running these gigantic metropolises don't want to offend or hurt the feelings of people by pointing out they shouldn't piss or crap on the sidewalk and should take a bath once in a while.

Rather than allow the homeless to create zones that are uninhabitable, the feds may order the removal of tent cities like this one in LA.

Tents housing homeless line a street in downtown Los Angeles. The number of homeless people counted across Los Angeles County jumped 12% over the past year to a total of 58,936. (AP Photo/Richard Vogel, File)

This comes on the heels of  a Washington Post report indicating President Trump has ordered a “sweeping crackdown” on homelessness statewide, including discussions on federal involvement “to get homeless people off the streets of Los Angeles and other areas and into new government-backed facilities”, officials told the Post.

Among the proposed plans is an effort to raze existing homeless camps in the city and move people into government-backed facilities, according to the Post.

In July, Garcetti told CBSLA he would “welcome [Trump’s] involvement” in the issue and “would be more than happy” to invite the president himself to walk the streets of L.A.

Let the heartless Trump bulldoze those tent cities and forcibly move people into cleaner facilities. Garcetti and other radical leftist mayors can wash their hands of doing what must be done to make life livable in these cities again.

This effort would scratch the surface and address only the symptoms of the problem. Making building housing attractive and profitable is what's desperately needed -- a language that Garcetti and his fellow liberal mayors can't speak.