Pentagon 'Corrects the Record', Says 11 U.S. Soldiers Are Being Treated for Concussions From Iran Missile Strike

No blood was spilled, but it turns out that eleven U.S. troops were injured in the multiple missile attacks earlier this month by Iran in retaliation for killing terror-master Qasem Soleimani.

President Trump and Pentagon chief Mark Esper said that no U.S. troops had been hurt in the Iran missile attacks. Now, however, Centcom confirms that "out of an abundance of caution," eleven troops are undergoing treatment for possible concussions because they developed symptoms later.

The Pentagon told CNN that "symptoms emerged days after the fact, and they were treated out of an abundance of caution. We corrected the record today."

A Pentagon spokesman reports that eight of the troops had been taken to the Landstuhl Regional Medical Center in Germany and three others were being treated in Kuwait, according to the Times of Israel:

“While no US service members were killed in the Jan. 8 Iranian attack on Al Asad Air base, several were treated for concussion symptoms from the blast and are still being assessed.

Out of an abundance of caution, service members were transported from Al Asad Air Base, Iraq to Landstuhl Regional Medical Center in Germany for follow-on screening. When deemed fit for duty, the service members are expected to return to Iraq following screening."

Iran is responsible for the killings of more than 600 U.S. military personnel in Iraq and Afghanistan through its IEDs and roadside bombs. The man who conceived of and expanded the bombings was Soleimani, who headed the Iran IRGC and Quds Forces.

IEDs/US Army Photo

The Military Times reports that "Tehran launched 16 ballistic missiles targeting coalition bases in Iraq, including al-Asad airbase, where approximately 1,000 U.S. troops are stationed" after Soleimani was hit by a couple of drone-launched missiles. U.S. officials were tipped off in advance that the missiles were incoming, but Defense One reports that the warnings didn't come from the outside, such as Iran.

Like the NFL, it looks as if the U.S. military has concussion protocols in place to make sure there are no long-lasting effects. One U.S. official told Defense One, "as a standard procedure, all personnel in the vicinity of a blast are screened for traumatic brain injury, and if deemed appropriate, are transported to a higher level of care. At this time, eight individuals have been transported to Landstuhl, and three have been transported to Camp Arifjan."