Ocasio-Cortez Wants to Recruit Primary Challenger for Progressive Dem Who Failed a Purity Test

There were three progressives whom the media disproportionately fawned over in the recent midterms: Beto O'Rourke, Andrew Gillum, and Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez. Of those three, only Ocasio-Cortez was elected. Then again, her big victory was in the primary. She ran in a district that was almost virtually guaranteed to elect a Democrat.

When she isn't busy saying incredibly stupid things (which keeps her quite busy), she apparently spends her time buying into the media hype about her.

A favorite media catchphrase about Ocasio-Cortez is that she is the "future" of the Democratic Party. That, of course, is on the days when Beto isn't. Apparently eager to show the party elders that the future is now, Rep.-elect Ocasio-Cortez (man, I hate hyphenated names when I'm writing about them) has reportedly picked out the first elected Democrat who she wants gone:

Rep.-elect  Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (D-N.Y.) is thinking of taking on Rep.  Hakeem Jeffries (D-N.Y.) by recruiting a primary challenger to run against him in 2020, according to a  new report from Politico.

Two people close to Ocasio-Cortez and Justice Democrats, a liberal group that has promised to back anti-incumbent challengers, told Politico that the incoming representative is eyeing a primary challenge for Jeffries, who was just elected to replace Rep. Joseph Crowley (D-N.Y.), whom Ocasio-Cortez defeated in a primary earlier this year, as caucus chairman.

Jeffries is seen by many as a rising star in the Democratic Party and possibly a future Speaker of the House.

But he's drawn the ire of progressive groups for accepting campaign donations from corporate interests.

A future speaker of the House! She certainly came out swinging for the fences, didn't she?

The eschewing of corporate and Wall St. campaign donations by progressives is one of the reasons I want to see more of them elected. Corporate America spreads its money around in a somewhat bipartisan fashion for bigger ticket elections. For example, Hillary Clinton received over $117 million in contributions from the "Finance, Insurance and Real Estate" sector in 2016. The only other group that gave more was "Other."

It's a safe bet that there is some corporate money in there.