NPR: Trump Staffers Are Hypocrites for Eating at Mexican Restaurants

It's come to this: according to some, people should be picking their casual dining choices based on their politics.

NPR published an opinion piece by writer Monique Truong that claims in the headline that it is "hypocrisy" for administration members who support President Trump's way of handling the long-ignored border crisis to eat at Mexican restaurants. These are people who work for the president, of course, so they are essentially being taken to task for doing their jobs.

Truong considers recent forays to Mexican food dining establishments by administration policy adviser Stephen Miller and Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen to be a "spectacle" that is "utterly galling to many Americans who object" to the recent policy of dealing with felony immigration offenders, which the president ended this week.

Truong acknowledges the pervasiveness of "Mexican-inspired" food in the United States. I'm from Tucson, it's not called "Mexican food" here, it's just "food." She concedes that it is now part of the "American table" but sternly lectures that we should be "appalled" that people who aren't on board with open borders and illegal immigration should choose to spend their hard-earned money at a Mexican restaurant. Her tortured logic asserts that since Mexican restaurants have "back-of-the-house" staff that "came from Mexico or Central America, with or without documents," people who oppose illegal immigration are experiencing a "disconnect" when dining at these establishments.

Of course, Truong can't precisely state it that way because the illegal nature of the situation is never even alluded to when open borders people are discussing the issue.

Truong also notes that there is a good chance that all of the D.C. area restaurants employ illegal staff, which means that iIn that sense, every restaurant is a 'Mexican' restaurant."

Using Truong's own logic, this means that anyone opposed to illegal immigration who eats in a restaurant is a hypocrite in the throes of a disconnect.

Truong devotes a good portion of the article to the class warfare ramblings that almost all leftists arguments devolve into. We are supposed to feel bad because the people here illegally earn less and the specter of being found out and deported keeps wages low. Never mind that all of the jobs in question are low-paying no matter who works in them.

Truong's op-ed comes the day after White House press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders and her family were refused service in a Virginia restaurant.

If the plan is to harass proponents of the rule of law for not adhering to leftist orthodoxy, it is more than likely doomed once they try to implement it away from the coastal progressive bubbles.

The real irony here is that this thought-policing opinion piece is on NPR, which still receives federal funding.

The very people Monique Truong loathes so much are helping to pay for her right to opine on how much she dislikes them.