07-20-2018 11:40:18 AM -0700
07-19-2018 01:47:29 PM -0700
07-19-2018 10:16:35 AM -0700
07-19-2018 07:10:51 AM -0700
07-18-2018 06:46:32 AM -0700
It looks like you've previously blocked notifications. If you'd like to receive them, please update your browser permissions.
Desktop Notifications are  | 
Get instant alerts on your desktop.
Turn on desktop notifications?
Remind me later.


Stretch, grab a late afternoon cup of caffeine and get caught up on the most important news of the day with our Coffee Break newsletter. These are the stories that will fill you in on the world that's spinning outside of your office window - at the moment that you get a chance to take a breath.
Sign up now to save time and stay informed!

Netflix Under Fire for Suspected Child Pornography Scenes

An Argentinian movie that Netflix offers called Desire is upsetting subscribers because of what looks like illegal content. Viewers on Facebook have shared a clip of the movie and are calling it outright child porn. In the opening scene, two little girls who look to be about seven and nine are playing "horse" on pillows. The older girl begins to obviously masturbate as the younger child watches. The camera even takes this scene into a closeup of the child's face in slow motion, moving up and down and panting like a porn star. The scene is graphic and includes an orgasm. The film is directed by Diego Kaplan.

I reported it to the FBI and the Department of Justice, who advised me to contact the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children. NCMEC told me they have launched an investigation into the movie.

Here is a link to the movie's IMBD listing. And here's the promotional photo:

The clip is making its way around Facebook, but anyone sharing it should be aware that it is a crime to circulate child porn, even if you are trying to get help for the child. Any further distribution revictimizes the child, and because of that, PJM will not share the video or photos from the movie that show the victims' faces. The only thing the public can do is report it to the authorities.

According to the Department of Justice, child porn is clearly defined.

Section 2256 of Title 18, United States Code, defines child pornography as any visual depiction of sexually explicit conduct involving a minor (someone under 18 years of age).  Visual depictions include photographs, videos, digital or computer generated images indistinguishable from an actual minor, and images created, adapted, or modified, but appear to depict an identifiable, actual minor.  Undeveloped film, undeveloped videotape, and electronically stored data that can be converted into a visual image of child pornography are also deemed illegal visual depictions under federal law.

Notably, the legal definition of sexually explicit conduct does not require that an image depict a child engaging in sexual activity.  A picture of a naked child may constitute illegal child pornography if it is sufficiently sexually suggestive.  Additionally, the age of consent for sexual activity in a given state is irrelevant; any depiction of a minor under 18 years of age engaging in sexually explicit conduct is illegal.

On this definition alone Netflix is in violation of distributing child pornography because the child in question is very clearly engaging in the sexual act of masturbation and this exceeds the minimum requirement of merely being suggestive. Netflix should be in serious trouble over this. The law further states that the law "prohibits the production, distribution, reception, and possession of an image of child pornography using or affecting any means or facility of interstate or foreign commerce."

Netflix is now distributing child porn for profit. This is not surprising to anyone who read my expose on Netflix's original series, Big Mouth, which is nothing but a cartoon that grooms kids for child abuse. It is a hideous and outrageous piece of garbage that includes talking genitalia of children, children telling jokes about blow jobs, and constant, unending masturbation. The obvious next step for Netflix is real-life children engaging in sexual activity. The question must be asked. How low can the entertainment industry go? And what kind of parents took money for their child to be used in this way?

PJM reached out to Netflix for comment but received no response. We will update if Netflix responds.

To report child pornography you can contact the National Center for Missing & Exploited Children (NCMEC) at www.cybertipline.com or call 1-800-843-5678.

[Editor's note: A previous version of this article noted in error that PJ Media reported the scene in question to the authorities. The author, Megan Fox, made the report as a private citizen.]