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Stretch, grab a late afternoon cup of caffeine and get caught up on the most important news of the day with our Coffee Break newsletter. These are the stories that will fill you in on the world that's spinning outside of your office window - at the moment that you get a chance to take a breath.
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Is It Fair for Boys to Compete on Girls Sports Teams?

Under normal circumstances, last week’s State Open high school girls track and field championships in Connecticut wouldn’t be a significant news story, even though one student broke some records:

Terry Miller of Bulkeley won the 100 meters in 11.72 seconds, beating the previous State Open record, set in 2004 by Shanea Calhoun of Wilbur Cross, by one-tenth of a second. She also won the 200 in 24.17 seconds, breaking the previous State Open record of 24.24, which was set in 1997 by Shayla Wallace of Northwest Catholic. Miller also placed fourth in the 400 (57.61).

What makes this story significant is that Terry Miller is not a girl. Terry Miller is biologically male—a transgender student who was allowed to compete on the girls team to match his “gender identity.” Miller had previously competed on the boys track team. This story gets worse. Another transgender student, Andraya Yearwood, came in second place in the 100-meter dash. So, two girls lost their opportunities to compete in the New England championships because two biological boys who "identify" as girls were allowed to compete on their team, and won handily.

How is this fair? According to Connecticut Interscholastic Athletic Conference (CIAC) executive director Karissa Niehoff, the girls who lost out to boys just need to suck it up. “We do feel for them. Fully agree it doesn’t feel good. The optic isn’t good. But we really do have to look at the bigger issues that speak to civil rights and the fact this is high school sports.”

But it’s not just high school sports. Over the years, stories like this have become more common in professional sports, too. Several years ago, a transgender MMA fighter who was biologically male but “identified” as a female made headlines for his shockingly brutal defeat of a real female opponent.

Transgender mixed martial arts (MMA) competitor Fallon Fox is facing new criticisms after breaking the eye socket of his last opponent.

On Saturday, Fox defeated Tamikka Brents by TKO at 2:17 of the first round of their match. In addition to the damaged orbital bone that required seven staples, Brents received a concussion. In a post-fight interview this week, she told Whoa TV that "I've never felt so overpowered ever in my life."

Brents’ description of the fight is simply horrifying. “I’ve fought a lot of women and have never felt the strength that I felt in a fight as I did that night,” she said. “I’ve never felt so overpowered ever in my life, and I am an abnormally strong female in my own right.”