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Feminist Prof Recommends Dangerous Drug to Make Men ‘Breastfeed’

baby looks over father's shoulder

Despite conventional knowledge that only women can breastfeed, a feminist professor at the University of Alberta, Canada, says this isn’t true, claiming that men and fathers are “increasingly” breastfeeding children by way of “induced lactation.”

Writing in the journal Feminist Theory, sociology professor Robyn Lee argues that men can easily breastfeed infants if only they agree to go through the draconian process of hormone supplementation and near-constant nipple stimulation.

The process would start with high doses of female birth control pills and estrogen supplements to “stimulate the state of pregnancy,” then those supplements would need to be swiftly discontinued to stimulate the rapid hormone changes that happen during birth.

Then, men would need to take the drug domperidone, writes Lee. Domperidone does not appear to be proven safe for use by either men or women, and cannot be prescribed in the United States because it lacks approval by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA).

In fact, the FDA decreed importation of domperidone a violation of federal law in 2004, citing reports of sudden death, heart attacks, and cardiac arrhythmias by patients abroad who had been prescribed it. The FDA also warned that it could harm infants.

Nevertheless, Lee encourages men to take the drug, claiming that it poses “minimal risk to healthy individuals” and “does not appear to pose risks to infants.” PJ Media emailed Lee to ask if she was qualified to suggest domperidone, but did not receive a response.

“Herbal and natural supplements are also sometimes taken in order to boost milk production,” adds Lee, conceding that some men prefer herbal supplements instead of taking domperidone. Nowhere in her article does Lee note the dangers of the drug, giving readers the illusion that it would be fine and safe to take it.