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Congress to Probe Leaks After New Strzok/Page Texts Indicate Prior Knowledge of News Articles

FBI agent Peter Strzok.

We've known for the past year and a half that bad actors in the United States intelligence community have been leaking anti-Trump information to the media.

Now it appears congressional Republicans may have identified who the culprits behind some of these leaks are.

New text messages between FBI counterintelligence agent Peter Strzok and FBI lawyer Lisa Page provided to lawmakers and reviewed by The Hill have prompted Republican-led House and Senate committees to investigate whether leaders of the Russia counterintelligence investigation leaked classified information to the news media. Not only do the texts strongly suggest the pair leaked, they also show them digging up personal information about a New York Times reporter, and savaging media personalities -- including Megyn Kelly.

One exchange shortly before Election Day 2016 indicates that Strzok and his mistress Lisa Page had prior knowledge about an article that appeared in The Wall Street Journal.

“Article is out, but hidden behind paywall so can’t read it,” Page texted Strzok on Oct. 24, 2016.

“Wsj? Boy that was fast,” Strzok texted back. “Should I ‘find’ it and tell the team?”

The two FBI agents discussed how they would make it look like they stumbled upon the article so it could be shared with colleagues.

“I can get it like I do every other article that hits any Google News alerts, seriously,” Strzok wrote, adding he didn’t want his team hearing about the article “from someone else.”

Strzok went from being a key member of the 2016 counterintelligence investigation to being a key member of the special counsel Russia probe until he was removed last summer by Robert Mueller for exchanging anti-Trump text messages with Page. Throughout the 2016 campaign, Strzok and Page referred to then-candidate Trump as a "loathsome human being," "an idiot," "awful," and a "douche," among other insults. Strzok also indicated that he would vote for Hillary Clinton, even though he had led the FBI's investigation into Hillary Clinton's improper use of a private server while secretary of State.

In a string of text messages five days before Election Day 2016, Page alerted Strzok to a story in The Washington Post about the Clinton email investigation.

Page referred to a conversation she'd had with FBI Chief of Staff James Rybicki, and expressed discomfort with the level of detail in the FBI’s timeline.

“Sorry, Rybicki called. Time line (sic) article in the post (sic) is super specific and not good. Doesn’t make sense because I didn’t have specific information to give.”

The two groused about another news article a few days later, complaining that it was anti-FBI. “Yep, the whole tone is anti-Bu. Just a tiny bit from us,” Strzok texted Page.

Page texted back: “Makes me feel WAY less bad about throwing him under the bus to the forthcoming CF article.” According to The Hill, congressional investigators are trying to figure out "what the 'CF article' reference means and who the agents thought they were trying to throw 'under the bus.'"