01-09-2018 01:54:15 PM -0800
12-22-2017 09:40:32 AM -0800
06-07-2017 12:17:49 PM -0700
05-09-2017 03:25:43 PM -0700
04-26-2017 09:52:11 AM -0700
It looks like you've previously blocked notifications. If you'd like to receive them, please update your browser permissions.
Desktop Notifications are  | 
Get instant alerts on your desktop.
Turn on desktop notifications?
Remind me later.


Stretch, grab a late afternoon cup of caffeine and get caught up on the most important news of the day with our Coffee Break newsletter. These are the stories that will fill you in on the world that's spinning outside of your office window - at the moment that you get a chance to take a breath.
Sign up now to save time and stay informed!

Comedian Iliza Shlesinger Sued for Banning Men From Audience

When I first heard that comedian Iliza Shlesinger was being sued for putting on a performance of only female comedians, I got a little upset. Why bother her over this? However, plaintiff George St. George was told that only women would be allowed in the audience, and that does sound like a problem.

Worse, St. George and a friend had already purchased tickets to Schlesinger's "Girls Night In" show November 13 in Los Angeles. At the time of the purchase, they were told they'd have to sit in the back, which was apparently fine with them. However, when they arrived for the show, the men were denied entry. An employee said that the theater and Shlesinger had decided men wouldn't be permitted to attend the performance, and offered a refund.

As Rolling Stone reports, the full title of the show -- "Girls Night In With Iliza -- No Boys Allowed" -- violates California state law. The lawsuit cites a 1985 state Supreme Court ruling that effectively banned "ladies' night" promotions.

St. George's attorney Alfred Rava told Variety: "At no time should an entertainer or an entertainment venue require female patrons or male patrons sit in the back of the theater based solely on their sex."

Rolling Stone added that Rava once served as secretary for a men's rights group. Why Rolling Stone felt that matters is a mystery.