Chick-fil-A Aborts Salvation Army in Favor of Gay Charity and Social-Justice Causes

Chick-fil-A announced recently that while it will no longer fund Christian organizations like the Salvation Army and Fellowship of Christian Athletes— both of which were targeted by gay activists—it will continue to fund Covenant House, which claims to aid people with homelessness and is loudly pro-gay, even sponsoring a float at the New York City Pride parade.

(Screenshot from Covenant House website)

But gay agenda aside (which Covenant House is clearly pushing), this most recent discovery should be the nail in the coffin for Christian fans of the chicken giant. Covenant House was reportedly photographed shuttling a girl to an abortion clinic. Sidewalk counselors outside the abortion mill, Summit Medical Center in Detroit, snapped the photo in September. Church Militant reported:

On Friday, at least four pro-life sidewalk counselors were shocked to see a Covenant House transport van pull up directly in front of them while they were holding vigil at  Summit Medical Centers, an abortion mill in Detroit.

Once a Catholic organization, Covenant House claims to help homeless young people escape from human trafficking.

Witnesses reported seeing a young girl get out of the van and walk into the clinic looking dazed and drugged. The incident happened on a Friday, the day the center performs medical abortions. The witnesses could not confirm what the girl was going to the clinic for, but reported that follow-up services are usually performed two to three days after the Friday abortions. The Detroit abortion mill was one of the clinics where the notorious "trunk abortionist," Michael Roth, sometimes practiced and was sued for perforating a woman's uterus and bowel during an abortion there. Roth was discovered with aborted baby remains in the trunk of his car, along with stolen drugs. His medical license was suspended and he was fined a mere $600 and served no jail time.

Covenant House denies that they counsel anyone to get abortions but they did not deny taking a girl to the clinic that day. They issued a statement in response to press inquiries:

We understand that a photograph of our van was taken on the street where Summit Medical Group [sic] is located and then shared on social media. Because we consider it our top priority to respect and safeguard the human dignity and personal sanctuary of our young people, we will not comment on personal information medical or otherwise, received by the young people in our care. But that said, it is our clear, long-standing policy and practice to respect the dignity of every human life.

Covenant House has been named as one of CFA's partners in charity to which the chicken outlet will be donating large sums of money. "To address youth homelessness, we are expanding our partnership with Covenant House International," says CFA's announcement.

According to a detailed analysis of CFA's charitable giving over the last few years, this should not have surprised anyone paying attention. Frontpage Mag's Daniel Greenfield did some digging that turned up shocking information about the Chick-fil-A Foundation. 

The Executive Director of the CFA Foundation is Rodney D. Bullard, a former White House fellow and Assistant US Attorney. Some may have mistaken him for a conservative because he was a fellow in the Bush Administration, but he was an Obama donor, and, more recently,  had donated to Hillary Clinton’s campaign while at Chick-fil-A.

The truth is, CFA has been giving to leftist social-justice causes for a long time. Greenfield continues:

The Chick-fil-A Foundation will go on funding leftist groups like Atlanta's Westside Future Fund. The Westside Future Fund is a project of the Atlanta Committee for Progress together with former Mayor Kasim Reed. It will just opt out of funding Christian groups whose views offend anyone on the Left.

The $1.7 million that the Westside Future Fund shoveled in last year from the CFA Foundation vastly outpaces the mere $115,000 that the Salvation Army got for its Angel Tree program to provide gifts for poor children during the holidays. But even that low end six figure donation was too much and the gifts had to be snatched away from the kids by leftist pressure groups and identity politics protesters.

Sorry kids, our politics are more important than your presents.

A less publicized donation of $100,000 went to Sustainable Atlanta. That could have bought a lot of gifts. There was also a $10,000 donation to Saris to Suits whose mission is to "advance women's empowerment, education, gender equality, and social justice."

There’s money for social justice, but not for the Salvation Army.

There was $25,000 for UNICEF and $75,000 for the Andrew Young Foundation. That last one isn’t a surprise. Carter’s radical UN ambassador sits on the CFA Foundation’s advisory board. $20,000 went to the Latino Leaders Network, another $20,000 to the Harvard Debate Diversity Network, $45,000 to the King Center for Nonviolent Social Change, and $5,000 was allotted to Friends of Refugees.

The latter boasts of resettling the sort of refugees who would demand that Chick-fil-A go Halal.

There’s money for Muslim refugees, but not for the Salvation Army.

Corporate giving is nothing more than social virtue-signaling that is designed to bolster the corporate image. CFA was lost the minute it created a foundation from which to trumpet its own goodness. Greenfield points out, and I agree, that if there's any company that could be held accountable, CFA might be it. After all, its conservative base brought it this far and if they should abandon ship, it's far less certain the small minority of leftist agitators will take up the support of the chicken giant they have hated for so long. They have so damaged CFA's brand among their supporters that it's unlikely to turn around soon, even with the news that CFA no longer supports "icky" Christian causes. But true accountability would not just be adding back the organizations CFA threw under the bus, but cleaning house at the foundation, where corporate leftists have settled in to funnel money to their favorite social-justice outlets.

Personally, I think it's too late. The last corporate hold-out has fallen. Get ready for CFA rainbow logos as early as next June.

Megan Fox is the author of “Believe Evidence; The Death of Due Process from Salome to #MeToo.” Follow on Twitter @MeganFoxWriter