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Stretch, grab a late afternoon cup of caffeine and get caught up on the most important news of the day with our Coffee Break newsletter. These are the stories that will fill you in on the world that's spinning outside of your office window - at the moment that you get a chance to take a breath.
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Britain: Land of Lost Hope and Faded Glory?

I hate to say it, but I think I'm giving up on Britain. Go ahead, Home Secretary Sajid Javid, add my name to that ever-growing list of Islam critics who are banned from entering your country. I won't be offended. In fact, I'll be offended if you don't ban me.

On his July 25 call-in show, UKIP founder and Brexit godfather Nigel Farage took up the issue of “grooming gangs” – you know, those groups of young Muslim men who have been raping young non-Muslim girls for years, decades even, in cities across the UK. The first one of these gangs to be publicly exposed, beginning in 2011, was in Rotherham, in South Yorkshire. That one gang, it turned out, had systematically and repeatedly raped about 1400 girls. Since then, reports have emerged about other such gangs in other British cities. In all or most of these cities, it has been discovered, police officials, journalists, social workers, politicians, and judges knew for years about the rapes but did nothing and said nothing for fear of being called racists.

This, then, is the topic Farage took up on July 25. And what question did he ask his listeners? Did he ask them whether the death penalty should be restored so that the rapists could get the punishment they deserve? Did he ask them what kind of disciplinary action should be taken against all those public figures who stood by silently while little girls were being sexually abused?

No. He asked them about Sarah Champion.

And who is Sarah Champion? She is the Member of Parliament for the city of Rotherham. Almost a year ago, on August 10, 2017, The Sun ran an opinion piece by her that began with the statement: “Britain has a problem with British Pakistani men raping and exploiting white girls.” She went on:

There. I said it. Does that make me a racist? Or am I just prepared to call out this horrifying problem for what it is?

For too long we have ignored the race of these abusers and, worse, tried to cover it up.

No more. These people are predators and the common denominator is their ethnic heritage.

In the remaining 500 or so words of her piece, Champion told about how, after becoming an MP, she learned in a committee room about this whole grooming thing. Unwiling to stay quiet, she launched a parliamentary inquiry. She saw to it that the police and courts changed their conduct. But some things didn't change. Victim support didn't improve. Action on the part of people at the highest level of the government wasn't forthcoming. As of August 10, 2017, she complained, such action was still nowhere in sight.