Brett Kavanaugh 'Was Always a Perfect Gentleman,' Say Two Women Who Dated Him

Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh hearing

Psychologist Christine Blasey Ford shook the political world on Sunday when she went public with an accusation that Trump's second Supreme Court nominee, Judge Brett Kavanaugh, sexually assaulted her in high school. On Monday, two women who dated Kavanaugh — and knew him in high school — joined the 200 other women who defended the judge's high moral character. Ford deserves to be heard, but so do these women.

"He was always a perfect gentleman, and I vouch for him completely," Maura Fitzgerald said. "Brett Kavanaugh and I have been good friends since high school. I dated him in college and he was and is nothing like the person who has been described" by Christine Blasey Ford.

"He always conducted himself honorably with me at all times when we were together," Fitzgerald explained.

Another woman who dated Kavanaugh in high school, Maura Kane, agreed with Fitzgerald.

“I’ve been friends with Brett Kavanaugh for over 35 years, and dated him during high school," Kane explained. "In every situation where we were together he always respectful, kind and thoughtful. The accusations leveled against him in no way represent the decent young man I knew."

Kane concluded, "We remain good friends and I admire him as a husband, father and professional."

These two former girlfriends joined 65 other women who knew Kavanaugh in high school in vouching for the judge's character. These 65 sent a letter to the Senate Judiciary Committee on Friday, insisting that he always treated women with respect.

"Through the more than 35 years we have known him, he has always treated women with decency and respect," the 65 women who knew Kavanaugh in high school wrote to the committee. "That was true when he was in high school, and it has remained true to this day."

"For the entire time we have known Brett Kavanaugh, he has behaved honorably and treated women with respect. We strongly believe it is important to convey this information to the Committee at this time," the women added.

In all, about 200 women have vouched for Kavanaugh's upstanding moral character. On the other side stands Christine Blasey Ford with a 35-year-old accusation she first voiced in 2012. Could she have misremembered, or confused Kavanaugh for someone else?

Christine Blasey Ford claimed that Kavanaugh and his friend were "stumbling drunk," and cornered her into a bedroom. She claimed that Kavanaugh forced himself on her, fumbled at her clothes, put his hand over her mouth to silence her, and groped her. She wrestled free and escaped before he could rape her, however.

The accusation is serious, but there is no evidence to prove it, one way or the other. Kavanaugh has categorically denied Ford's claims, and the testimony of 200 women — who call him a "perfect gentleman" — backs him up. Even if the judge did this horrendous thing in high school, he has treated women with respect ever since. He made history by having four female clerks in one year at the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Washington, D.C. circuit.

One mother, who has a daughter on the basketball team Kavanaugh coaches, said that the judge prioritizes his daughters over his work, chauffeuring the girls to games. When this mother's husband died, Kavanaugh even took her daughter to the father-daughter dance, effectively adopting her as his own.

This man's entire history speaks of a tremendous respect toward women. He entered the legal profession after being inspired by his mother! Against this background, claims of sexual assault seem rather hollow. This does not make Ford's story false, and if he indeed assaulted her, that is serious.

However, there is a reason why any such assault would fall outside the statute of limitations — it would be extremely difficult to prove, one way or the other. That makes Ford a character witness against Kavanaugh, and there are about 200 other women who stand as character witnesses for the judge. The Senate will have to decide whom to believe.

When considering Ford's accusation, it is important to recall that more than 200 people were arrested for protesting at his hearing, and that the Women's March reimbursed protesters at that event.

Terrified that Kavanaugh might strike down Roe v. Wade (1973), liberal women dressed up as handmaids from "The Handmaid's Tale" under the asinine argument that a judge like this would bring about a misogynistic dystopia where women can't work, can't own property, and are systematically raped. Actress Alyssa Milano added her voice to this ridiculous claim.

When women seem to think Kavanaugh represents a systematic repression of women in which they will be raped to produce children, is it such a stretch to suggest one of them — and Ford is a Clinton supporter — would be so terrified of the judge as to "remember" him assaulting her when it was in fact someone else? She may not even be intentionally misremembering.

The Senate will hold a hearing involving both Ford and Kavanaugh next Monday, and with any luck that will bring some clarity to this accusation. When discussing the judge's character, however, it is important to listen to the 200 women — and the two who dated the "perfect gentleman" — who vouch for Kavanaugh in addition to the one woman who claims he assaulted her.

Follow the author of this article on Twitter at @Tyler2ONeil.