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5 Absurd Overreactions to the Senate Passing Tax Reform

old white man compares tax reform bill to raping the poor.

In the wee hours of Saturday morning, the U.S. Senate passed a major tax reform bill. While the U.S. House of Representatives passed a version of the same bill, the two are not identical, so the measure now goes into a process called "reconciliation" before it hits the president's desk. Even so, liberals (and at least one former Republican) started freaking out, as if this bill were the end of the world.

Here are some of the most ridiculous responses to the passage of the tax bill. Enjoy!

1. "America died tonight."

Kurt Eichenwald, a senior writer for Newsweek and contributing editor for Vanity Fair, took up the Chicken Little cry with gusto.

"America died tonight," Eichenwald tweeted. "Economic suicide adopted to feed the insatiable greed of donors, who have been refusing to dole out $ to GOP until they got their tax cuts. Voters fooled by propaganda and tribal hatred."

The writer concluded with a message to young people. "Millennials: move away if you can. USA is over. We killed it."

The most ironic thing about his entire tweet? Donations have been rolling in to the Republican National Committee (RNC) over Trump, long before tax cuts. The RNC has thirteen times as much money as its Democratic counterpart.

As for the tax bill ending America, there's no need to respond to such a ridiculous claim.

2. "There's no America now."

Comedian and actor Patton Oswalt took up the theme asking, "Is there any going back after this Tax Bill Scam? To America? Does it matter now if Trump is impeached? There's no America now."

At least he clarified, "Not the one we knew. Sorry, feeling real despair this morning."

The Atlantic's Conor Friedersdorf, no fan of Trump or the tax bill, shot down this ridiculous statement. "I don't understand these reactions," Friedersdorf tweeted. "Trump and his Republican enablers are doing a lot of permanent damage. Tax policy is among the things any future government can just reverse."