The Morning Briefing: The U.S. Anticipates Astronomical Metaphor Today and Much, Much More

Good Monday Morning.

Here is what's on the President's agenda today:

  • In the morning, President Donald J. Trump will receive his daily intelligence briefing.
  • The President will then have lunch with Vice President Mike Pence.
  • Later in the afternoon, the President will meet with Secretary of State Rex Tillerson.
  • The President will then participate in a swearing-in ceremony of Robert Wood “Woody” Johnson, IV as United States Ambassador to the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland.
  • In the evening, the President will depart the White House en route to Fort Meyer.
  • The President will then give a Presidential Address to the Nation.
  • The President will then depart Fort Meyer en route to the White House.

The latest on the USS John S. McCain

The USS John S. McCain, a Navy guided-missile destroyer, collided with an oil tanker east of Singapore early Monday morning. Ten sailors remain missing.

This is the fourth accident in Asian waters so far this year.

The Navy reported significant hull damage to the McCain, saying there was flooding in berthing compartments as well as machinery and communication rooms.

"Search and rescue efforts are underway in coordination with local authorities," the Navy said in a statement posted on the website of the Commander of the U.S. Pacific Fleet.

"In addition to tug boats out of Singapore, the Republic of Singapore Navy ship RSS Gallant, RSN helicopters and Police Coast Guard vessel Basking Shark are currently in the area to render assistance," it said.

Developing...

Trump to give speech on path forward in Afghanistan

On Friday, President Trump held a meeting with his national security team at Camp David and tonight he will reveal the U.S. path forward in Afghanistan and South Asia. Trump will deliver the speech from Ft. Meyer in Arlington, VA.

Options on the table include proposals to send roughly 3,000 to 5,000 more U.S. troops to a conflict that stretches back to the 9/11 attacks in 2001. More than 2,400 Americans have been killed in Afghanistan.

The top commander in Afghanistan, Gen. John Nicholson, has said several thousand additional troops are needed to help break the stalemate in the war against the Taliban, the Islamic State and other insurgent groups there.

Any additional U.S. and coalition troops would remain in a support role in Afghanistan, helping to advise Afghan forces, which have suffered high numbers of casualties in the fight against insurgents. The coalition is also providing limited air support for Afghan government forces.

Mattis said Sunday while en route to Amman, Jordan, that he is satisfied with how the administration formulated its new Afghanistan war strategy. But he refused to talk about the new policy until Trump discloses it.