Dutch Court to Rejected 'Refugees': Go Home or Starve

Holland, which has been suffering from the "refugee" influx even before Muslim immigrants were called "refugees," can now expel them without worrying about European notions of "human rights."

A Dutch high court on Thursday upheld a government policy of withholding food and shelter to rejected asylum-seekers who refuse to be repatriated, giving legal backing to one of Europe's toughest immigration policies. The Raad van State or Council of State, which reviews the legality of government decisions, found that the new policy of conservative Prime Minister Mark Rutte does not contravene the European Convention on Human Rights.

A rejected asylum seeker does not have the right to appeal to the European Social Charter, it said.

The Dutch government "has the right, when providing shelter in so-called locations of limited freedom, to require failed asylum-seekers to cooperate with their departure from the Netherlands," a summary of the ruling said.

This is a good first step. The Europeans have been buffaloed by the trammels of the European super-state, looking over their shoulders at the bureaucrats in Brussels and the corruptocrats of the UN before daring to defend themselves against the invasion of their territory by "migrants" from the ummah of Islam.

Thursday's ruling counters an August report by the U.N.'s Committee on the Elimination of Racial Discrimination, which told the Dutch they should meet migrants' basic needs unconditionally. "As long as they are in The Netherlands, they have to enjoy minimum standards of living," co-author Ion Diaconu, wrote at the time.

Says a Romanian, whose own country has largely been spared the "migrant" influx because it is poor and inhospitable to Muslims, having had hundreds of years of experience with them.

The EU's leading human rights forum, the 47-nation Council of Europe admonished the Netherlands in 2014 for placing asylum seekers in administrative detention and leaving many "irregular immigrants" in legal limbo and destitution. Europe's worst migrant and refugee crisis since World War Two has led to a surge in support for far right Dutch leader Geert Wilders, who wants to close the borders.

The Netherlands is the eighth-largest destination for asylum seekers in the European Union, accounting for 4 percent of total arrivals in 2014. Total applications last year rose 87 percent to 24,535.

The way things are going, Wilders will probably be the next leader of the Netherlands. And then, watch out.