Can Trump Actually Win the Black Vote?

It would seem tantamount to insanity to suggest that Donald Trump could win, or even make a sizable dent in, the African-American vote in 2020, but I submit that it's not quite as crazy as it sounds and he should give it a serious shot.

He should go into the black community as often as possible and make his case. This would be using identity politics in order to destroy it. (A noble task. Good riddance.)

Trump clearly has a good case to make — black and Hispanic unemployment are at their lowest numbers ever. These stats have been repeated so often a good portion of these minorities already knows them. But there's no harm in repeating and making sure.

There's also no harm in repeating that for a human being, any human being, a decent job is far better than welfare, better for the soul and better for the pocketbook.

Trump might want to point out, as many have, how Democratic Party welfare programs have caused the break-up of the black family to a shadow its former self. The only way to change that sad state of affairs is to create real-work opportunities.

And speaking of work, I think it's safe to say that Trump, over his lifetime, has created more jobs for African-Americans than all the Democrat candidates added together and cubed. (In the case of Pete Buttigieg it's probably to the fiftieth power.)

So Democrats have no choice but to continue to exploit African Americans the way they always have, since long before LBJ's famous use of the n-word. (Should Trump reference that? Actually, it's an erroneous quote, but what LBJ did say is arguably worse — and an accurate prediction of what transpired over the next decades.)

Over the last few days, we have seen the Democrats go race crazy, outbidding each other with asinine proposals. Reparations are back, ratified by nearly all the candidates to one degree or another.

That is insane. And racist. Over 850,000 soldiers died in the Civil War, the majority on the Union (i. e. Republican) side. It was by far the greatest military loss in the history of our country, all to free the slaves, the only such war of this magnitude ever conducted, a deeply moral war that succeeded. Imagine telling the families of those people they have to pay reparations. They already did — and then some.

But that's not all. Many people immigrated to this country throughout the twentieth century, years after slavery. They include Armenians fleeing their Holocaust that cost 1.5 million lives; Ukrainians escaping the Holodomor when Stalin starved somewhere between one and two million of their citizens; the Nazi Holocaust with the death of six million Jews and on and on.

I knew Cambodians in Los Angeles escaping Pol Pot. Do these people owe reparations? Are you crazy?

I can only say, as I did in my book, that this is "nostalgia for racism," a desire to create it where it doesn't exist. It's despicable beyond words and reason enough never to vote Democrat.

But back to Trump and what he can do to gain more of the African-American vote. Unlike virtually all the Democratic candidates, Trump is an upper. He has humor. My guess is African-Americans — many of them anyway — are dying to have him come into their communities, even if they don't admit it. (Watch how many show up compared to the Democrats.) He's much more their kind of guy than any of the Dems. (Look at the problems Buttigieg is having. And Biden's appeal is paper thin. Do you think Warren would make it with black people? How about the semi-black or whatever he is Cory Booker who is so scared of his shadow he can't even diss the most famous anti-Semite in America? Way to go Cory. And then there's Bernie, who thought the Soviet Union was so great in the Eighties (the same time I was there and Soviet writers were begging me for help to get out — I couldn't) that everything he ever says sounds like the second coming of Eugene V. Debs. Not much help to black people and they know it.

So, Donald, the floor is yours. Take it.

Roger L. Simon — co-founder and CEO emeritus of PJ Media — is an award-winning novelist and Academy Award-nominated screenwriter. His new book will be published shortly. He sincerely hopes you look for it.