Will Newt Gingrich Grow Up — and Win?

Flush from his victory in South Carolina, what many of us want to know, indeed are dying to know, is — will Next Gingrich grow up?

We do all know this: He's the best debater and close to the most brilliant mind in American politics, regardless of party. If, at the ripe old age of 68, he can finally mature emotionally to somewhere approximating his intellectual development, he could become the next president of the United States. And he might even be a great one.

Lord knows we need it. I am one of those who is easily suckered by Newt because I enjoy hearing the ideas — even seeing the workings — of an original mind. It's a rare thing, particularly in politics.

But Newt has a big ego. And you don't need to be Sigmund Freud to realize that means somewhere he is insecure. He wants to make sure we know he is the smartest guy in the room. And, as with any of us, that isn't always true. There's always someone out there who's brighter, some Djokovic to knock Nadal and Federer off the stand.

We all have to face that, no matter how good we are. Al Gore was never able to. Newt Gingrich should learn from him. If, as Newt says, he really is such a devout religious convert, now is the time to show humility, not with the mainstream media or Barack Obama, but with the rest of us -- the ones would elect him president.

He should continue to eviscerate the MSM. They are so reactionary in their essence they don't even realize it. But he doesn't need to trumpet the greatness of Newt. He just needs to tells us what he intends to do.

We all know he's had a dicey private life and that he has profited from the execrable Fannie and Freddie. He should just move on, not defend himself stupidly or tell us who thinks he was more virtuous in a private relationship. Most of us don't care and know there are two sides to practically any personal story anyway.

He also should quit the baloney about giving history lessons to larcenous execs at Fannie and Freddie. We all know that's crock. Just move on and tell us about the future. It might even be smart to admit you did something wrong. We all have.

Everything is amazingly fluid these days, but at this juncture, Saturday night January 21, 2012, happy days are here again for Newt Gingrich. He's been given a second chance by the voters of South Carolina.

But the dark side of that is its probably his last chance. We're all giving Newt a second look because we know how good he can be, how... dare I use the word... possibly visionary.

But this is his last chance. He blows it this time and it's over. And not only for him.... possibly for us as well.