Parenting

Mother Warns Parents of the Dangers of Vacuum Cleaners

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When your baby becomes mobile, it’s typical to start babyproofing your home to make sure your little one can roam around without getting hurt. People usually plug up their outlets, cushion sharp furniture corners, and use baby gates to block flights of stairs. But it is easy to forget that basic home appliances can be just as risky to have around small children.

Jade Bishop, of Somerset, England, didn’t think twice about using her Dyson vacuum cleaner around her 16-month-old son, Theo. She had just finished cleaning and went to unplug the machine when she heard her little boy screaming because he had gotten his thumb trapped in the pipe at the bottom of the vacuum where the bristles spin. In an instant, she was whisked into a parent’s worst nightmare.

According to the Daily Mail,

“At the doctors I assumed they were going to send us straight home after they had bandaged him up but they wanted us to see a specialist in Bristol the following day.”

“The consultant told us Theo had fourth degree burns and they were concerned about his tendons being exposed as it could result in restricted movement and severe scarring.”

Ms. Bishop and her fiancé, Nigel White, 25, have now been advised that if their son’s wound does not heal within two weeks the chances are he will have to have a skin graft.

She added: “It really hit home that such a small injury could have such a huge effect.”

“But the burns unit have been great, as it’s a three hour round trip for us they have been sending their burns specialist nurses to us twice a week to change Theo’s dressing.”

So I wasn't going to post this for a few reasons, mainly the criticism from people and the fact that I felt like the…

Posted by Jade Bishop on Sunday, March 12, 2017

Young Theo has been incredibly brave throughout the ordeal. He has endured the dressing changes, which were incredibly painful in the beginning, like a pro.
As if parents don’t worry enough about their kids, this story acts as a reminder of just how easily (and quickly) a child can be harmed in the home. Of course, we can’t wrap them all in bubbles (as tempting as that may be), but it’s always important to think one step ahead.

Ms. Bishop is now urging parents, grandparents and carers to be vigilant around the home whilst young children are about.

She said: “I felt awful after it happened and of course blamed myself, but it can happen to anyone.”

“All it takes is for someone to turn their back for a split second and that could have huge consequences. I just want to make people think twice about what they are doing when small children are around, there are so many hidden dangers and I would hate for this to happen to anyone else.”

Best of luck to Theo and his parents as he continues on the road to recovery.