Parenting

Parents Charged With Injecting Children With 'Feel Good' Heroin to Help Them Sleep

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A mother from Tacoma, Washington, has done the unthinkable. Ashlee Hutt, 24, was recently arrested for giving her three young children heroin. She and her boyfriend, Mac McIver, are being charged with unlawful delivery of a controlled substance to a minor, second-degree criminal mistreatment, and second-degree child assault.

Child Protective Services removed the children from their mother’s home because they found heroin, needles, and rat droppings. They then found marks on the children that were consistent with needle injections. The six-year-old boy told police that his mother and her boyfriend would inject him and his sisters (ages four and two) with a mixture of white powder and water that the couple referred to as “feel good medicine.” He said that they (the children) would usually fall asleep afterwards.

The New Tribune reported:

The oldest child was interviewed a month later and described being choked by McIver and then injected with [heroin].

The 2-year-old girl tested positive for heroin through a hair follicle test two months later.

CPS investigators interviewed Hutt and McIver, who admitted to being heroin addicts and talked about other people at their house using heroin.

The mother and the boyfriend were arrested in September. Bond was set at $100,000 and they both remain in custody. Hutt’s jury trial is set for December 20. McIver will appear in court on February 16, 2017.

The judge issued a restraining order prohibiting the parents from contacting the children or being within 1,000 feet of their homes, schools, or future places of employment.

“They’re in foster homes,” Pierce County Sheriff’s Department spokesman Detective Ed Troyer told CNN affiliate KIRO. “And they’re doing well.”

Washington parents accused of injecting children with heroin

Two parents could go to prison for decades after allegedly injecting their three children with heroin. At home, they called it "feel good medicine," according to court records. http://cnn.it/2fd70XU

Posted by CNN on Wednesday, November 2, 2016