Mother Loses Her Mind When a 'Racist' White Teacher Touches Her Daughter's Hair

President Barack Obama leans over to allow Edwin Donley, right, touch his hair during his visits to Gen. Clarence Tinker elementary school at MacDill Air Force Base, (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais) President Barack Obama leans over to allow Edwin Donley, right, touch his hair during his visits to Gen. Clarence Tinker elementary school at MacDill Air Force Base, (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)

It seems this guy didn't get the memo about the "unspoken understanding" in the black community that hair is a no-go zone.

If we are to overcome this race issue that threatens to tear us all apart, the anger and the hatred need to be killed and buried for good.

For if you live according to the flesh, you will die; but if by the Spirit you put to death the misdeeds of the body, you will live. (Romans 8:13)

He who says he is in the light but hates his brother is still in darkness. (1 John 2:9)

When my middle daughter was two, she was very interested in black people, fascinated by their skin and she was loud about it. The choice we face as neighbors and fellow humans was illustrated perfectly through my innocent toddler. We were sitting down to dinner in a busy restaurant and a black family walked in and sat next to us. The matriarch of the family came in last and walked by our table and my two-year-year-old shouted out in her loud voice, "Mommy, her skin is so beautiful!" I agreed with her that it was and tried to smile at the woman, hoping to ease any awkwardness. She glared at me and turned away. Choice.

A few days later we were in the grocery store and a black man stood behind us in line. This same toddler was staring with big eyes at his dark brown skin. She seemed to know better than to blurt out what she was thinking this time, but it was written all over her face. He leaned down close to her and said "Do you want to touch it?" and he held out his arm. She smiled and stroked his hand. "It doesn't come off," he said "God made it that way." My toddler laughed and held his hand and wondered over this man, whose skin was so different from hers. They chatted for a bit and she patted his face and blew him kisses and we went on our way, smiling, laughing and happy to be neighbors with such a wonderful person who would take time out of his day to answer the questions of a small child without being angry or hurt. Choice.

Children are not repulsed by skin color. They naturally love God's creativity and rainbow palette. Stop teaching them to revile and hate. I am praying for this mom, I'm not angry with her. I am genuinely sad for her that she harbors such hatred and mistrust of her fellow humans who are lighter than she. It's a bitter pill that will poison her whole family and community. She had a choice that day and she chose anger and hate when she could have chosen laughter and love. She could have teased the teacher about her bad hairstyling skills. She could have told her how to do better in the future. She could have thanked her for trying.

Our differences should be celebrated and talked about. Our similarities should also be equally celebrated and talked about. Segregation and fear will only lead to more and more racial unrest and unhappiness. Like my pastor always said whenever issues of racial upset would strike our area of Chicago, "The Devil is a liar!" The people of God are meant to love one another. There is only one race. The human race. Stop this madness.