An Election for the Boo-Birds

As Canada approaches its October 21 federal election, it is obvious that it would take someone like Donald Trump to rescue this country from a crater of socialist lies, faddist memes, rampant welfarism, “social justice” debauchery, climate boondoggles, economic bankruptcy, unsustainable immigration, and, in short, a veritable Pandora’s Box of cultural and political ills.

The leaders of our traditional parties can only be charitably described as, to be blunt, imbeciles or scoundrels, or both. Much has been written about Liberal prime minister Justin Trudeau as Canada’s Embarrassment-in-Chief, a bezomian who has regularly beclowned himself in public, praised China’s “basic dictatorship,” assured us that budgets balance themselves, embroiled himself in scandals, been found in violation of the Conflict of Interest Act, bribed the media with the promise of a $600 million gift, and indebted Canada’s future generations to the tune of $685.5 billion and counting—indeed, Trudeau is projected to be the largest debt accumulator in Canadian history. No wonder he has recently been endorsed by Barack Obama.

A self-promoting paragon of virtue, photos have recently surfaced of Trudeau in blackface, which the press is frenetically excusing. Like the opportunistic cullion that he is, Trudeau’s latest hijinks involve his wearing a bulletproof vest at a Liberal rally in response to an alleged security threat whose source has not been identified—unless, of course, as Rebel News journalist Sheila Gunn Reid points out, quoting a Liberal flak on CBC TV, we blame Conservative free-speechers, yellow-vesters and the little that remains of an honest media. Ezra Levant’s just released The Librano$—merging the words “Liberals” and “Sopranos”—tells us all we need to know about Trudeau’s corruption and unfitness for office.

Though this is Trudeau’s election to lose, with only one exception none of his major challengers are worthy of respect or consideration. Greenie Elizabeth May is a national joke, appealing mainly to leftcoasters. Back in the day she warned that we had only weeks to meet the Kyoto Accord objectives. Now, a decade later, she’s at it again hyping the Paris Agreement targets—or else. If Elizabeth goes unheeded, we will all shortly bake and writhe in indescribable agony.

New Democrat Party leader Jagmeet Singh, like Bernie Sanders, promises the moon and all the planets without indicating how he realistically intends to pay for the bonanza of free stuff he is prepared to give away. He has tried to prevent Maxime Bernier, leader of the newly formed PPC (People’s Party of Canada), whom he accuses of being a racist, a Neo-Nazi and of promoting an “ideology of hate,” from participating in election debates, and has said on CTV News that “We don’t respect Conservatives. We’re going to always fight Conservatives because we don’t believe in their cuts to services, we don’t believe in how they could harm people. We’re going to fight them.” He believes that Canada is a racist country—“No question about it,” he says. A real sweetheart, this Singh.

Conservative leader Andrew Scheer has all the depth, substance, and personality of a breakfast pancake and is practically invisible on the election stumps. There is not much to distinguish him from Trudeau. He too was embroiled in scandal, having been accused of lying about his ostensible stint as an insurance broker, a needless resume ploy. In terms of policy, he supports high levels of immigration, believes in fake climate science, thinks the carbon tax is a good thing, will allow the universities to persist in doubling down on their exclusionary speakers’ platform policies, and craftily regards himself as a feminist to garner votes. Scheer is Trudeau lite and possibly the Conservative party’s greatest electoral blunder—not that anyone on the Conservative roster is a viable alternative.

The only federal leader who has the vigor, forthrightness, insight, gumption, and plain-speaking smarts of a Trump is the aforementioned Maxime Bernier, who lost the Conservative Party nomination by a whisker for his principled stand against Canada’s Dairy, Poultry and Eggs cartel. Bernier then founded the PPC with a true Conservative platform: ending official multiculturalism, slashing the number of immigrants flooding into the country while seeking skilled newcomers, reducing taxes, exposing the pseudo-science of climate change, balancing the budget, ending open borders, reforming Canada’s dysfunctional health care system, building pipelines for exporting oil and gas, and protecting free speech. For these sins he has been excommunicated by the media, denounced as a hater and a divisive factor, and called every name in the book.

As blogger and former University of Lethbridge philosophy professor Grant Brown states in a personal communication, “There isn't a single ‘hateful’ thing in the PPC platform, and I challenge anyone to point to something ‘hateful’ in it. Nor is there anything ‘divisive’ about defending such age-old western values as property rights, liberty, equality under the law, free speech, [and a] free press (as defended by such luminaries as Niall Ferguson, Stephen Pinker, and Matt Ridley).” But few people seem to be listening.

If the Conservatives manage to sneak past the polls, Bernier might perhaps be able to establish himself as a swing vote. An eventuality of this nature would count as a form of poetic justice, but it seems unlikely. Certainly, Bernier’s chances of forming the next government are zero, given the relentless vendetta launched against him by the Canadian media, the fact that the party is only beginning to get off the ground, that it has been largely shut out of the national discussion, and the almost insurmountable problem of being a genuine conservative in a left-leaning country increasingly afflicted by the pestilence of identity politics. Canada as presently constituted does not deserve a Bernier. It is not so much a country as an imaginary construct awash in feel-good abstractions beloved by so-called “democratic socialists,” cultural Marxists, political fraudsters and economic illiterates.

So we are now engaged in an election favoring the Boo-Birds, whether Trudeau, Scheer, or Singh, or some possible coalition of the Libs and NDP. After all, a Boo-Bird has been defined as a wingling that can cause its targets to wilt and people to lose all strength and ambition as long as the Boo-Bird directs its antennae at them. And the malignant force emanating from these antennae shows no sign of abating any time soon.

Maxime Bernier might derive some consolation from the fact that Donald Trump wouldn’t stand a chance in this country.