SJWs Want Us All to Read Nonexistent Racism, Sexism, and Homophobia into 'Rudolph'

On Saturday, HuffPost published a hit job on a 53-year-old movie, based on nothing more than unthinking animus (a.k.a. "bigotry") toward a popular children's tale. HuffPost accused the film of racism, sexism, homophobia, and every sort of bigotry — not realizing that the movie actually condemns these attitudes toward "misfits."

The HuffPost video featured a montage of tweets attacking the 1964 film "Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer" -- and attacking the movie's "sins." It concluded with a tweet from user Cass Martino: "Deviation from the norm will be punished unless it is exploitable."

The HuffPost attack suggests that this is the key theme of the movie, as if "Rudolph" were defending the kind of bullying directed at Rudolph and his elf friend (who wants to be a dentist) throughout the film.

"Yearly reminder that Rudolph the Red Nosed Reindeer is a parable on racism & homophobia w/ Santa as a bigoted exploitative prick," tweeted Garytt Poirier in the first message to show up in HuffPost's video.

Next, the video featured an attack on "Santa's operation." A user with the handle "AngryBluePlanet" declared, "Santa's operation is an HR nightmare and in serious need of diversity and inclusion training."

The video featured one last tweet from self-described "Anti-Trump! Geek!" John T. Terrible. This user posted a meme reading, "It's good we don't fit in. It means we're not a**holes."

The HuffPost video also listed all the "marginalization" in the movie: Rudolph's father Donner "verbally abuses him"; Santa Claus mocks Donner for his son's nose; the school coach encourages bullying; Donner forbids his wife from joining the search for his son, saying: "No. This is man's work"; Rudolph's girlfriend Clarice has a bigoted father; and "even the elf is an outcast for wanting to be a dentist."

Every single one of these accounts is true. Donner is a bully, the coach is a bully, Santa is a bully, Clarice's dad hates Rudolph for a skin-deep reason, and both Rudolph and the elf are marginalized characters.

But the movie doesn't end there. In fact, "Rudolph" has the main character and his elf friend prove themselves, and receive honor — and heartfelt apologies — from Santa, Donner, and the insulting elf.