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Is #MeToo a Women's Rights Movement or an Excuse to Mainstream Porn?

Aziz Ansari Golden Globes

The headline reads, “Stormy Daniels Reportedly Spanked Trump With A Copy of Forbes Magazine.” It’s only the latest in a series of sexually inspired stories swirling around famous men (in this instance, the president of the United States, no less) in the wake of the #MeToo movement. After reading so many deeply personal, grossly detailed accounts of sexual encounters over the past few months, I’m left wondering: Has the movement that started out with the intention to shine a spotlight on sexual assault been taken over by the pro-pornography crowd?

Women began by calling out the Harvey Weinsteins, the serial sexual predators, the date rapists, the harassers and abusers among us. Now they’re attempting to turn every negative yet consensual sexual encounter into an abuse story. The hot take industry, in turn, is churning out more opinions than we could ever clearly digest. In doing so, they’re reiterating the lurid details we don’t need to know in order for a point to be made. Do I need to know that a woman willingly bent over Matt Lauer’s desk upon command for me to believe that he was a sexual predator? Nope, the creepy door lock button is evidence enough, thanks.

It is as if by not sparing us the details we’re being forced to accept as normal the kind of sexual acts that used to be the stuff of pulp fiction and the pornographic underground. That is nothing short of a pro-pornography advocate’s greatest wish: To mainstream all forms of sexual activity into the language and behavior of the culture at large. Sex advocates have been abusing the feminist movement in order to do this for years. Whether you’re talking Slut Walks, genderless bathrooms, genderless babies, HBO’s Girls, or the growing trans movement’s invasion of women’s space (even The Vagina Monologues isn’t safe from the pro-sex crowd)m the bottom line is always the same: Pro-sex and the mainstreaming of what used to be considered pornographic sexual behaviors into everyday life.

To add insult to injury, this mainstreaming of pornographic literature is all being justified in terms of honest, open dialogue that empowers women. These lurid accounts are supposedly published in order to confront the bad guys. But, what’s the real end-goal in that? The really bad ones lose their jobs, of course. But their millions have already been made. So, who’s really being punished here? The shamed man? The humiliated woman? Or the millions of readers forced to know exactly what Aziz Ansari likes to do with his fingers during a sexual encounter?

If we want to talk consent, how about asking readers for their permission before sharing stuff that not too long ago would’ve been password protected or hidden behind a paywall? Today’s teens don’t have to surf porn websites to learn about dirty sex; they just need to read the top trending story on Twitter. But, hey, that’s cool because it’s supporting essential dialogue on women’s rights. And just like one woman believed Ansari was obviously pursuing a deep emotional connection after meeting her briefly at a party, feminists believe teen boys and girls aren’t going to get wrapped up in detailed descriptions of lurid sex acts and completely forget about women’s rights? So much for empowerment.