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Book Plug Friday: Meet Pam Uphoff

[Yes, BPF is coming suspiciously close to being Book Plug Saturday this week. Give us a break, we're still being retrained. — Charlie]

PJM: So, you’re one of the new independent writer/publishers, making it out there, in the new world of selling stories directly to the public.

Well . . . not actually that new. My first Indie publication was in 2011, so I have almost seven years of experience.

PJM: Tell us how you came to publish indie? Was it a choice?  Did you ever do it traditionally? Do you also traditionally publish?

I tried the traditional route, and collected the traditional rejection slips that I understand are a requirement to call oneself a writer.

Then I braced myself and put up a novel by myself . . . and another . . . And here I am, six and a half years later with fifty-four titles up.

Then Amazon started the Kindle Direct Publishing, and I put up a novella through some friends’ start-up small press. Then I braced myself and put up a novel by myself . . . and another . . . And here I am, six and a half years later with fifty-four titles up.

Then I braced myself and put up a novel by myself . . . and another . . . And here I am, six and a half years later with fifty-four titles up.

PJM: How did you start writing?  What did you envision as your career in writing (if you did)?

I grew up making up stories, inventing worlds, and having adventures in my head. A few of them even got written down. But it wasn’t until I got on the internet and met some “real” writers that I realized I might be able to join their ranks.

It was an utterly astounding thought.

But, online coaching, real-world writers workshops . . . and I was off and running.

The best part is being in control of the entire process. And getting up-to-date sales information. Taking the entire blame—and the entire credit—for every book.

PJM: What are the good and bad points of being an indie author?  Would you like to be traditionally published someday, or do you have absolutely no interest in doing it?

The best part is being in control of the entire process. And getting up-to-date sales information. Taking the entire blame—and the entire credit—for every book.

The bad parts? Having no one but yourself to blames for the awful covers! J And not getting into bookstores. And those are the only reasons I can think of to publish traditionally.

For covers, inexpensive art and fancy fonts are a Google search away.